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Showing 7 posts filed under: Other [–], Support [–] [Show all]

Crime victims meet offenders in new restorative justice programme

from the article by Rachel Millard in The Argus:

A mother said it “felt good” to look a burglar in the eye and explain the damage he caused her family.

Tracey Clift sat down with the thief who took irreplaceable items including the medal her grandfather had won in the First World War and a charm bracelet from her father.

She went to meet him in Lewes Prison, where the burglar is serving time for other crimes, almost five years after he broke into her Worthing home via the kitchen window and stole “most of our family history” from the safe.

Nov 26, 2014 , , , , , ,

The offer of restorative justice to victims of violent crime: Should it be protective or proactive?

from the study by Jo_Anne Wemmers and Tinneke Van Camp:

The victims in our sample suggest generalizing the offer of restorative justice to all victims. Themselves victims of very serious crimes, they experienced the beneficial impact of participation in a restorative intervention. However, while they believe that all victims should be informed about restorative opportunities, they emphasize that victims have to feel ready to participate in such programs. 

Oct 18, 2011 , , ,

Response by Dr Martin Wright to European Commission consultation document: Taking action on rights, support and protection of victims of crime and violence

From the response by Dr. Martin Wright:

The key to this reply is in the last answer:  that in principle restorative justice practices should be available to all victims, subject only to the safeguards mentioned in the reply to Question 17.  Restorative processes are in the interests not only of victims, but also of offenders and the community.  

Victim-offender dialogue is valuable as an end in itself as well as a means to an end.  For many victims, action to make the offender less likely to re-offend is at least as high on their list of priorities as monetary compensation or reparation through work.  When the victim and offender agree on one of these methods of reparation, it is incumbent on the community to provide the resources to enable offenders to carry them out.  

Oct 01, 2010 , , , , , ,

European Commission's Victims' Package: Consultation on taking action on rights, support and protection of victims of crime and violence

from the announcement in the European Commission's Freedom, Security and Justice area:

The Commission intends to adopt a package of measures, including a Directive on minimum standards for victims of crime, in the first half of 2011 in particular to replace the 2001 Framework Decision on the standing of victims. This consultation gives stakeholders the opportunity to present their views about which concrete actions could be developed at EU level that would bring real added value. It will also give the Commission an insight into concrete experiences of those working with victims of crime, particularly regarding the difficulties they encounter when assisting victims and the problems faced by those victims. The Commission is looking in particular for reliable data, factual information and specific real-life examples, regarding both problems and solutions.

Jul 29, 2010 , , , , ,

Crime victims treated like the 'poor relation'

from Dominic Casciani's article on BBC.co.uk:

The first commissioner for victims of crime in England and Wales says the criminal justice system treats them as a poor relation and an afterthought.

Too often victims found themselves a "sideshow" as police, prisons, lawyers and the courts focused on the offender, Louise Casey said.

She said too much time was spent trying to help all crime victims, rather than focusing on those in genuine need.

Jul 28, 2010 , , , , ,

Can prisoners also be victims? Promoting injustice through legislation

by Kim Workman

Last week’s introduction of the Prisoners' and Victims' Claims (Expiry and Application Dates) Amendment Bill, brings to mind one of the most shameful incidents in the history of New Zealand’s prison system.  As Head of Prisons at the time, it gives me no great pleasure to reflect on the incident and the subsequent political response to it.  

In January 1993, three young prisoners at Mangaroa (now Hawkes Bay) prison were systematically beaten and tortured by prison officers.  They held the young men naked in outside exercise yards, and used hit squads to repeatedly beat them over a three day period.   The prisoners were initially denied access to medical support for injuries which included bruising and cracked bones.

May 18, 2010 , , , , , ,

Restorative Justice Centre's submission to Ministry of Justice on victims' rights

The Restorative Justice Centre at AUT University in New Zealand has responded to a discussion draft titled "A Focus on Victims of Crime: A Review of Victims' Rights" on how the government might better address the needs of crime victims. Following are excerpts from RJC's response:

9. The central justice needs of victims are submitted to be accountability, vindication, empowerment, information, truth-telling and future safety. Only the first and last of these are addressed (to some degree) by the current legal process, and then only when the offender is convicted. Thus in crimes that go largely unreported, such as sexual offences, there can be no feeling of accountability in the absence of alternative processes, and victims remain unsafe.

10. The remaining four central justice needs are those which Dr Howard Zehr, known to and used by MoJ as a consultant in restorative justice, has said are “especially neglected”. They are next mentioned separately. However they overlap with needs identified by other writers.

Mar 30, 2010 , , , , , , , ,

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