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Showing 8 posts filed under: Prison [–], Region: North America and Caribbean [–], Country:USA [–], Dialogue [–] [Show all]

Review: The Final Gift: A documentary film

The Final Gift: A Documentary Film was produced by Therese and Doug Bartholomew and is distributed through 1936 Productions and SansPerf Productions. Running time is 1 hour and 15 minutes. The DVD is available for purchase online

Reviewed by Lynette Parker

The Final Gift-- A Documentary Film offers an intimate look into one woman’s journey of healing following the violent death of her brother. Therese Bartholemew’s brother, Steve, died after being shot in an altercation at a club. This film results from her attempt to understand what happened and its impact on their family. It chronicles their emotions and responses from receiving the first phone call to the sentencing to Therese’s meeting with the offender. 

Nov 13, 2012 , , , , , , , , ,

For Sonoma cyclist’s widow, meeting husband’s killer changed her life

from the article by Chris Smith in the Press Democrat:

For many months, Patty O’Reilly plotted and rehearsed and steeled herself for the perfect act of vengeance on the man who killed her husband on a rural Santa Rosa road in 2004.

On the appointed day, O’Reilly strode into Folsom Prison. Led to a small room, she took a seat across a table from Michael Albertson, who’d been an enraged alcoholic when his careening pickup slammed into the bicycle Danny O’Reilly, 43, was riding toward home in Sonoma.

Nov 12, 2012 , , , , ,

Denver woman feels the power of restorative justice after son murdered

from the article by Kevin Simpson in the Denver Post:

....When legislation last year cleared the way for a pilot program in restorative justice with the Colorado Department of Corrections, Evans — who had testified on behalf of the measure — embraced the opportunity to go first. She and her older son Calvin Hurd, who was 6 when gunshots peppered the car where he sat sleeping with his brother, began more than six months of preparation for a direct dialogue with Johnson.

Part of that involved revisiting the crime. Evans had driven with her two children to a northeast Denver duplex to pick up her grandniece because there had been a drive-by there the previous night. She left her sons in the car.

Aug 03, 2012 , , , , , , ,

Meeting the murderer: Profile of victim-offender dialogue facilitator

from the entry on Grits for Breakfast:

See an interesting article from the Christian Science Monitor about a boat builder from Maine who runs a non-profit facilitating victim-offender dialogue (VOD) between violent criminals and their victims or their families, which is an idea derived from "restorative justice" models. 

Apr 27, 2012 , , , , , ,

Murderers turned peacemakers

from the article by Laurel Kaufer on Peace X Peace:

How is it that women, with dark pasts, serving time for murder and manslaughter, could possibly become honored peacemakers?

Their story is one of personal commitment to themselves and the community in which most are destined to live out their lives. “This is an environment filled with conflict and violence. There is a dire need and want for change,” says Susan Russo, one of the fifteen initial peacemakers, serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole at the largest prison for women in the world, Valley State Prison for Women in Chowchilla, CA. “Mediation interests all of us because we are lifers and long-termers hoping to make a difference in teaching our peers that there is a better way.”

Beginning her quest in 2007, Sue Russo wrote over 50 handwritten letters from prison to mediators all over California. Her letters went unanswered until August of 2009 when one of her letters made it to me, Laurel Kaufer, Esq., a Southern California mediator and peacemaker and founder of the post-Katrina Mississippi Mediation Project.

Sep 06, 2011 , , , , , , ,

Colorado mother wishes for meeting with son's killers

from Ivan Moreno's article in the San Francisco Chronicle:

The 3-year-old boy affectionately known as "Biscuit" was sleeping in the back of a parked old Cadillac when the shooting began.

Fourteen bullets hit the car in the drive-by shooting outside a northeast Denver duplex. Biscuit was shot in the head and died. His brother, Calvin, four days shy of his 7th birthday, and a teenage cousin were unhurt.

Sharletta Evans — mother of Biscuit, or Casson Xavier Evans — came to forgive the gunmen, who were 15 and 16 years old at the time of the Dec. 21, 1995, shooting. But it took years for her to decide she wanted to meet them in prison, hoping for closure.

A new Colorado law encourages the state Department of Corrections to facilitate such reconciliation meetings. Yet it's a process that requires they be safe and don't backfire on victims. And prison officials say there's simply no money to make it happen in the near future.

Jul 21, 2011 , , , , , ,

Dialogues can offer healing for crime victims

from Ryan Marshall's article in the Carroll County Times:

Recovering from a crime can be a deeply personal process for victims, but Maryland's corrections system offers victims who are interested a chance to interact with their attackers.

The state is able to arrange dialogues between victims and the person incarcerated for their crime.

May 23, 2011 , , , , ,

Va. OKs bill to let violent crime victims meet with death row inmates

from Dena Potter's story on wtvr.com:

Lorraine Whoberry tried for years to meet face-to-face with her daughter's killer before he was executed last month. She was repeatedly denied.

So the day after she witnessed his execution, Whoberry sat down with Gov. Bob McDonnell and asked for his help. A bill was making its way through the Virginia General Assembly that would allow victims of violent crime to meet with the perpetrators, but it excluded those on death row and juveniles.

McDonnell amended the bill to allow victims to meet with inmates on death row. On Wednesday, the General Assembly unanimously approved the change.

Although more than half of the states have victim-offender mediation programs, advocates said Virginia would be one of the first to cement it in state law. Virginia also becomes one of only a handful that allow meetings with death row inmates.

“Even though it's not going to affect us, at least we've got something done,” Whoberry said when told about the change.

Apr 27, 2010 , , , , ,

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