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Showing 10 posts filed under: Prison [–], Region: North America and Caribbean [–], Restitution [–] [Show all]

Garden provides more than fresh food

from the article in the Daily Journal:

More than a ton of fresh produce was harvested from the Restorative Justice Garden at the Farmington Correctional Center.

The exact amount was 2,053 pounds of potatoes, tomatoes, cabbage, beans, okra, bell peppers, and zucchini.

This huge pile of nutritious goodness was picked over the course of just three days. Shortly after being picked, the veggies were on the way to helping others.

Aug 25, 2014 , , , ,

Lost Dog Restorative Justice provides a positive vision

from the "Restorative Justice" page of the Lost Dog & Cat Rescue Foundation:

In order to rescue more dogs from being put to sleep, we are in need of more foster homes.  The Roxbury Correctional Institution (RCI) in Hagerstown, Maryland is working with the Lost Dog and Cat Rescue Foundation to implement a Restorative Justice Program.  Utilizing the prison system and appropriate inmates to serve as foster caregivers can greatly increase our capacity to rescue dogs from the threat of euthanasia.  

Oct 03, 2012 , , , ,

Baltimore's oldest black cemetery finally restored, with help of inmates

from the article by Justin Fenton in the Baltimore Sun:

....After decades of neglect, interrupted occasionally by well-meaning but ultimately fruitless cleanup efforts, the cemetery in South Baltimore was officially rededicated Monday, due in large part to the labors of an unlikely group: state prison inmates.

As part of a program to put those serving time to work on meaningful projects, more than 40 prisoners have worked on the four-year effort to transform the cemetery's 34 acres.

Jul 05, 2012 , , , ,

A second chance at Curt's Cafe

from the article by Susan Du in The Daily Northwestern:

Curt’s Cafe, 2922 Central St., is an unlikely crossroads for the two: Trieschmann hires at-risk young adults, particularly those with criminal records, providing them with hard-to-find job training and work experience. The non-profit restaurant is one of the only adult ex-offender re-entry programs in a city that focuses most of its re-entry resources on at-risk youths.

Trieschmann said the road to opening the experimental business was far from smooth, with some neighbors concerned about the business drawing former criminals to Central Street. Still, it’s an experiment that restorative justice advocates and even Evanston Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl said is worth a shot.

Jun 05, 2012 , , , , , ,

Art helps heal crime's wounds

from the article by Howard Zehr in the Philadelphia Inquirer:

I admit it. Sometimes I have Philly envy. Philadelphia has a Mural Arts Program, and the community in which I live does not. 

....I have been drawn to the arts as a way of reframing the challenges of crime and trauma. The arts can engage the whole person to express or understand the harm done and help harness heart and intelligence to reduce isolation. The arts can provide a way to explore what can be done to give back, and to give voice to the full range of human experience. The act of creation can restore a sense of meaning and agency to those who harmed and those who have been harmed.

May 22, 2012 , , ,

A view from behind bars: School of Theology and Ministry exhibition showcases artwork by American prisoners

from the article in The Boston College Chronicle:

An exhibition of more than 40 works of art that depict images of grief and hope created by men imprisoned in American jails and penitentiaries will open at the School of Theology and Ministry on March 15.

“Seeing the Man: Art From Behind Bars, A Vision of Restorative Justice and Healing” will be on display through April 30 in the Atrium Gallery of the STM Library, located at 117 Lake Street on Brighton Campus. The works of art are provided by Do-Right Ministries, a non-profit organization that raises awareness about the American justice system and promotes healing through art.

Mar 12, 2012 , , ,

Restorative justice provides new path for prisoners

from the article by Jesse Bishop in the Misourian:

....This is no television prison. There is no guard or glass wall. There are no handcuffs or restraints, just a couple of cameras and a conversation. A conversation about where they came from, why they’re here, but most importantly a conversation about where they’re going. It’s a path with few options.

“On the other side of that door, it’s either hell or redemption,” Baumgardner says. “You choose.”

“That door” leads to the bowels of Jefferson City Correctional Center, a maximum security prison. Starr, Baumgardner and King have all chosen the latter path. Hell is what got them here. Restorative Justice offers them a chance to change that.

Feb 17, 2012 , , , , ,

Missouri prisons grow 50 tons of food for pantries

from the article on stltoday.com:

Missouri prisoners have raised more than 50 tons of vegetables and fruit that have been given to food pantries around the state.

The Department of Corrections says this year's harvest was significantly higher than last year's, when the agency donated 29 tons of produce through its Restorative Justice Garden Program.
Under the program, the seeds and plants are donated to the Corrections Department, which then donates all the resulting food to local pantries.

Nov 07, 2011 , , , ,

Giving back: RCI’s Restorative Justice Program helps inmates help others

from Christine Won's article in the Journal Times:

On a recent Friday morning, 13 inmates at the Racine Correctional Institution in Sturtevant diligently worked on their needlework, their nimble fingers pulling together tiny stitches or weaves. The fruits of their toil lay strewn about the tables: a Mickey Mouse look-alike, a doll, random bears and other stuffed animals, as well as scarves, hats and more slowly took shape.

Those bears and lamb pillows have made their way into little hands around the community, and those mittens and gloves will keep others warm this winter.

Charity Crafts is part of the prison’s Restorative Justice Program, through which inmates find ways to give back to the community, according to Tommie Thomas, RCI program supervisor.

Jul 28, 2011 , , ,

‘Puppies for Parole’ making a difference

from Mark Morris' article in the Kansas City Star:

Puppies for Parole, as the Missouri Department of Corrections calls the program, is at work in eight state prisons, where offenders have the time and patience to give dogs from shelters basic obedience training.

Jul 23, 2010 , , , ,

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