Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

RSS
Filter
Showing 7 posts filed under: Prosecutor [–] [Show all]

Not adding up: Criminal reconciliation in Chinese juvenile justice

from the article in Dui Hua's Human Rights Journal:

Recent amendments to China’s Criminal Procedure Law involve special procedures for handling cases involving juvenile defendants and resolving cases through criminal reconciliation. Although the law does not explicitly link the two, criminal reconciliation has been a key feature in the development of China’s juvenile justice system under the principle of “education first, punishment second.”

Dui Hua welcomes criminal reconciliation as a means to restorative justice and reduced juvenile incarceration, but research suggests that the relatively new measure is experiencing some growing pains in China. Jiang Jue (姜珏), a PhD candidate in the School of Law at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, has done extensive research on criminal reconciliation in China and has seen how the process works in many juvenile cases. Her research indicates that current implementation of criminal reconciliation falls short of juvenile justice principles by alienating youth and stifling attempts at education.

Jun 20, 2012 , , , , , ,

D.A. candidate Jackie Lacey looks to move up

from the article by Robert Greene in the Los Angeles Times:

....California faces a sweeping revamp of the way it delivers and administers criminal justice. Under the policy change known as realignment, counties must take on the task of incarcerating and supervising many felons who formerly went to state prison. The next district attorney of Los Angeles County will play a lead role in developing and articulating policies that will determine whether smart, cost-effective alternative sentencing practices lead to rehabilitation — or instead to dangerous criminals being released, unsupervised, into the community. 

Jun 06, 2012 , , ,

Growing past hate: 'Restorative justice' helps heal pain from teens' vandalism

from the article by Fred Van Liew in the DesMoines Register:

In March of 1994 members of the Temple B’nai Jeshurun in Des Moines awoke to find neo-Nazi graffiti scrawled on the side of their synagogue. There were no immediate suspects, but there was anguish, anger and outrage.

May 09, 2012 , , , , ,

Utah’s mental health court addresses repeat offender problems

from Jason Nowa's article on Voices of Utah:

Sim Gill believes that jail is for people who have murdered, raped, or who harm children and not a place for the mentally ill. He is currently in the process of trying to accomplish this.

Gill, who is the Salt Lake County District Attorney, recently spoke to small group of University of Utah students on about his job and the passions that drive him. Gill spoke about various processes,  from how he deals with the death penalty, drug abuse and to the mentally ill committing crimes. The United States jails more people than any other country in the world, he said. Gill estimated around 2.2 million people in the United States are currently incarcerated.

Mar 27, 2012 , , ,

In Dharun Ravi trial, criminal retribution will not serve justice

from the Guest Column by Joseph C. d'Oronzio in the Star-Ledger:

I watch with increasing discomfort as the arch of justice sways with uncertainty in that New Brunswick courtroom where the fate of former Rutgers University freshman Dharun Ravi is being considered.

Mar 15, 2012 , , , , ,

Lawyers as Peacemakers: Practicing Holistic, Problem-Solving Law

Lawyers as Peacemakers: Practicing Holistic, Problem-Solving Law. Chicago: ABA Book Publishing. 2010. 528 pp. ISBN 978-1-60442-862-9.
from Lainey Feingold's review on BeyondChron:

J. Kim Wright is an ambitious woman. In this comprehensive resource manual, she describes dozens of ways in which lawyers, judges and legal workers across the country (and around the world) are attempting to change their profession for the better. The terms sound hopeful – Holistic Law, Renaissance Law, Transformative Law, Law with a Meditative Perspective. Spiritual Law, Law as a Healing Profession, Restorative Justice, Therapeutic Jurisprudence. Most profoundly, as the title reflects, “Lawyers as Peacemakers.”

Lawyers as Peacemakers, published by the American Bar Association, clocks in at over 500 pages including appendixes, resources and information about its many contributors. The book includes essays, quotes, interview snippets, profiles and articles written by both Wright and leaders in the various alternative legal processes she explores.

Jul 06, 2010 , , ,

Taiwan hopes Japanese comics can teach prosecutors

from AFP:

Taiwan has asked its prosecutors to read a Japanese comic book dealing with compassion and tolerance in an effort to improve their work performance, an official said Wednesday.

The justice ministry has distributed 2,000 copies of the Japanese manga "Love" based on the true story of how a bereaved mother reconciled with a family whose sixth-grader son killed her boy.

The touching story was made into a critically acclaimed television series in Japan that was aired on the island last year.

Jan 29, 2010 , , ,

RSS
RJOB Archive
View all

About RJOB

Donate

 

Correspondents

Eric Assur portlet image

 

LN-blue
 

 lp-blue

 

lr

 

dv-blue

 

kw-blue

 

mw-blue