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Showing 10 posts filed under: Region: Europe [–], Other [–] [Show all]

Witnessing change

from the article posted by Prison Fellowship England & Wales:

Rachel*, a Sycamore Tree volunteer, told us of how listening to a victim’s experiences had completely changed the attitude and behavior of an offender.

“Tyrone* was an offender that stood out to me. I remember him saying:

“In my past life I was a taker. I was robbing banks, shooting people, drinking, being involved in adultery, blasphemy and coveting my neighbour’s women. My sinning was prolific and I enjoyed it, I actually revelled in it.”

Jul 21, 2014 , , ,

Offender: “Sycamore Tree is not just a course, but a life changer”

from the article by PF England and Wales:

I completed this course some months ago, but I am still experiencing the benefits even today. I am a huge advocate of Sycamore Tree as it has opened my eyes to the impact of my crime on numerous people, especially those who I did not know about, those who were victims through the ripple effect.

Jun 17, 2014 , , , , ,

Experiencing the Sycamore Tree course

from the article posted by Prison Fellowship England and Wales:

At the start of this year, I had the privilege of attending a Prison Fellowship ‘Sycamore Tree’ course in a women’s prison. I joined an experienced group facilitator and got to know several women who had committed crimes and were serving time.

Apr 01, 2014 , , ,

Actions and consequences: How restorative justice can help victims move on

from the article by Javed Khan:

If you were a victim of crime, would you want to meet the offender?

What would you say to them?

A burglary victim might, for example, want to talk about the inconvenience, the hassle of sorting out the mess and replacing what has been stolen.

They could spell out that some things - just objects to an outsider - are completely irreplaceable, and how sentimental value outweighs any financial cost.

But we all know that actions have unintended consequences, and burglary isn't just about what's been taken, it's about what's been left behind too.

Nov 25, 2013 , , , , ,

Evaluation of The Forgiveness Project within prisons

from the article by Joanna R. Adler and Mansoor Mir:

The Forgiveness Project (TFP) is a UK based charity that uses real stories to explore how ideas around forgiveness, reconciliation and conflict resolution can have a positive impact on people’s lives. One aspect of the charity’s work is a programme run within prisons, targeted at the early stages of a sentence.

Dec 07, 2012 , , , , ,

Unite offering prisoner mediation service at Kirklevington Grange Prison

from the article by Sandy McKenzie in the Evening Gazette:

....Mr James said the focus was always on the long-term goal of reducing reoffending. “We’re also providing a victim-offender mediation service for those Kirklevington prisoners who agree to talk to their victims and where the victim agrees to meet the perpetrator.

“This is one way a prisoner can show they have taken responsibility for their actions. They may want to offer an explanation to the victim. They may want to say sorry and agree a way to make amends.”

Nov 28, 2012 , , , , , ,

New Staffordshire crime-fighting partnership praised by Justice Secretary

from the article by Sonya Britton iin This Is Staffordshire

On a visit to Staffordshire's new integrated crime-fighting hub, Justice Secretary Lord McNally met former offenders, victims of crime, and staff from police, probation and drug treatment agencies.

And Lord McNally was impressed at the joint working shown by the 180° Integrated Offender Management partnership, which aims to help tackle the most challenging and prolific offenders in Staffordshire in an integrated way.

Jun 08, 2012 , , , , , , ,

The three different levels of Restorative Justice

From the article in the Sentinel:

Level One is for minor offences or non-criminal incidents like anti-social behaviour, which can be dealt with immediately by the officer at the scene.

All Staffordshire officers are being trained in this area.

May 15, 2012 , , , , , ,

Chickens and chats form basis of new prison life

from the entry on This is Cornwall:

...."It may sound gimmicky, because this is supposed to be a prison and a place of punishment, but the people I'm charged with looking after are some of the most troubled and troublesome members of society," he said. "Their individual backgrounds are horrendous in terms of not having a father figure, and a lack of education and the opportunities that you and I experienced."

Through treating prisoners with "decency" and giving back a sense of respect, staff are already seeing a drop in incidents of bullying and drug abuse. A large number of prisoners have volunteered to sign up to a scheme to donate a small weekly sum to the Victim Support Service.

May 07, 2012 , , , , , , ,

My experience with the Sycamore Tree Project(sm)

from the article by a British prison chaplain:

I’ve been facilitating the Sycamore Tree courses in my prison now for about eighteen months. Sycamore Tree is the Restorative Justice programme run by Prison Fellowship (http://www.pfi.org/). It is a six week course which runs one afternoon a week.

Over such time you would not expect very much to happen. How can you change a person’s outlook on their life in six short afternoons?

Feb 06, 2012 , , , ,

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