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Showing 10 posts filed under: Region: North America and Caribbean [–], Country:Canada [–], Policy [–] [Show all]

How to settle the Pacetti affair — without politics

from the article by Steve Sullivan in iPolitics:

The problem of Massimo Pacetti seems to be one with no obvious solution.

The Montreal MP was kicked out of the Liberal caucus by Justin Trudeau after an NDP MP came forward to accuse him of sexual misconduct. His accuser — like a lot of women in similar circumstances — has rejected going the justice system route. Parliament has no process in place to deal with such cases....

Mr. Pacetti's accuser has said that she doesn't want “vengeance … It is only a desire to be heard, a desire to have an apology, a desire, in the end, to heal.”

Dec 10, 2014 , , ,

The problem with restorative justice

from the entry on Kwe Today:

....What I would like to write about is what I considered a major fundamental flaw of restorative justice. In particular, this type of justice is credited for being closely related to Aboriginal justice and sometimes the two are considered one in the same (which is one of the first problems). 

May 27, 2013 , , , ,

Restorative justice & violence against women

from the entry by Deb Monkman on the BCSTH Library blog:

One of our BCSTH members asked me to do some research on restorative justice and its role in cases of violence against women. Here is a summary of my research process.

Feb 18, 2013 , , ,

Restorative justice community/classroom conferencing: A guide for parents and teachers

from the booklet by Nocole Pakan and the Society for Safe and Caring Schools and Communities:

It may seem surprising, but many children and youth often misbehave, not because they are trying to harm or disrupt the well-being of others or because they are “bad kids,” but because they are simply trying to meet a personal need, albeit in a negative way. “Children’s behaviours are determined, for the most part, by how they feel about the current state of their physical and psychosocial needs.”

Dec 06, 2012 , , , , ,

Nova Scotia spends $500K on 'restorative justice' bullying program in schools

from the article by Kris Sims in Sun News:

Nova Scotia is spending $500,000 to expand anti-bullying campaigns in schools, hoping "restorative justice" methods modelled after native sentencing circles can curb the problem in the province.

"Students will largely avoid the stigma of being 'sent to the office' or being suspended. We should not underestimate the negative side-effects of a child's experience at school if that experience involves multiple trips to the principal's office or suspensions from school," reads a government handout on the approach.

Nov 23, 2012 , , , , ,

Dalhousie offers restorative justice option for students

from the article on updatednews.ca:

Dalhousie University students who end up in trouble with the law now have a way to try to right the wrong without having to go to court.

The University, police and the province’s Justice Department have set up a restorative justice program just for students of the school. It’s the first program of its kind for university students in Canada.

Oct 11, 2012 , , , , ,

Restorative justice is the law

by Dan Van Ness

Heartspeak Productions is a remarkable Canadian group that describes itself as "on a continual quest to learn about & share the principles and best practices of restorative justice." It does this by creating excellent videos exploring dimensions of restoration. Fraser Community Justice Initiatives Association is a community NGO also in Canada that for 25 years has developed programs and training that help people in conflict find good resolutions.

Sep 04, 2012 , , , , , , , , ,

Power of One: Restorative justice couples victims with offenders

from the article on CTV.ca:

....A woman named Marité has been taking part in the process, not by facing her sexually-abusive father, but rather, another man who committed similar acts.

She said that results have helped her cope with the damage she suffered.

"For him it was like I was his daughter," said Marité. "And I was able also to express my anger to him and that's what he wanted rather than silence from his daughter."

"I can now go forward because I'm not bound to my father anymore. I can leave him go."

Jun 26, 2012 , , , , , , , ,

The moral question

from the article by Kent Spencer in The Province:

....Elliott proposes a comparatively low-tech, low-cost method for dealing with the vast majority of offenders. It involves public apologies and community service in a concept known as restorative justice - meaning literally to restore the community to what it was.

He has offered to bring confessed wrongdoers to a place where they can meet with people who suffered trauma at the hands of roving thugs.

Jun 04, 2012 , , , ,

Harper government misguided in its tough-on-crime approach

from the Globa and Mail editorial:

David Daubney, a justice-department adviser, could have gone quietly into retirement. Instead, he tried to talk some sense back into this country. Prison overcrowding will worsen and breed violence, he told The Globe's Kirk Makin in an exit interview. The tough-on-crime route has been tried and failed. The government knows what it knows, doesn't listen to evidence and is reluctant to ask for research to be undertaken.

“The policy is based on fear – fear of criminals and fear of people who are different. I do not think these harsh views are deeply held.” It's a good point. A new poll shows that 93 per cent of Canadians feel safe from crime. Why, then, spend billions of dollars to go backward?

Dec 29, 2011 , , , ,

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