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Showing 10 posts filed under: Politics [–] [Show all]

Harper government misguided in its tough-on-crime approach

from the Globa and Mail editorial:

David Daubney, a justice-department adviser, could have gone quietly into retirement. Instead, he tried to talk some sense back into this country. Prison overcrowding will worsen and breed violence, he told The Globe's Kirk Makin in an exit interview. The tough-on-crime route has been tried and failed. The government knows what it knows, doesn't listen to evidence and is reluctant to ask for research to be undertaken.

“The policy is based on fear – fear of criminals and fear of people who are different. I do not think these harsh views are deeply held.” It's a good point. A new poll shows that 93 per cent of Canadians feel safe from crime. Why, then, spend billions of dollars to go backward?

Dec 29, 2011 , , , ,

Fearmonger and Through The Glass: Books that undermine Harper's omnibus crime bill

Shannon Moroney. Through The Glass. by Shannon Moroney. Toronto: Doubleday Canada, 2011. 368pp.
Paula Mallea. Fearmonger: Stephen Harper's Tough On Crime Agenda. Toronto: Lorimer. 2011, 232pp.

from the review by Matthew Behrens in rabble.ca:

It's a rare event in the Canadian publishing world when non-fiction books line up in sync with current events, but these two titles are perfectly timed as Canadians consider the serious consequences of the Harper government's dramatic omnibus crime bill, one that will radically alter an already deteriorating judicial system.

....Those who'd like an inkling of what could come down the pipe can do no better than read Paula Mallea's appropriately named Fearmonger, an outstanding overview of recently passed and proposed crime legislation.

Dec 28, 2011 , , , , ,

Restorative justice: Making crooks say 'sorry' is a success

from the article by Stephan Briggs in the Evening Telegraph:

....Today, Cambridgeshire police Chief Constable Simon Parr said he was delighted with the project’s success.

He said: “Restorative Justice has been a real success across the whole of the county and especially in Peterborough.

“We have had no complaints from anyone about using this as a deterrent or punishment, as people can see a result straight away.

Dec 16, 2011 , , ,

A review of the Youth Justice System in Northern Ireland

from the report by the Department of Justice Northern Ireland:

One of the most positive developments to have arisen out of Northern Ireland’s recent history is the expansion of rich and varied restorative practices. Restorative approaches have been used to respond to offending and anti-social behaviour, family disputes, disruptive behaviour in schools and children’s homes and in helping prisoners reintegrate back into their communities. Early teething problems have been largely overcome and professional practice in restorative justice in Northern Ireland is now internationally recognised.

Dec 01, 2011 , , , , , , ,

Standing Committee

from Wilma Derksen's entry on Bittersweet:

I am meeting with the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights this morning.

This is what I will be saying.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I am pleased to have this opportunity to address you and the rest of the committee regarding Bill C-10, The Safe Streets & Community Act.

....My daughter, Candace, was 13 years old when she was abducted and found murdered six weeks later. We lived without knowing the details of what happened for two decades.

Nov 23, 2011 , , , , , , , ,

How victim rights became a juggernaut shaping spending, laws and the future of punishment

from the article by Alan Prendergast in Denver Westword:

Newly elected as a state representative, Pete Lee hit the Capitol last January fired up with big ideas. The biggest of them all was the restorative-justice bill he introduced shortly after the session began.

Oct 28, 2011 , , , ,

Prison Reform Trust poll finding: 88% support restorative justice after the riots

by Lizzie Nelson

In 1998 the British Crime Survey found that 41% of victims said they would agree to meet the offender, if this was offered to them, and 58% would accept reparation from the offender. In September this year, following the riots that took place across England in August 2011, an ICM poll, commissioned by the  Prison Reform Trust found that 88% of the public thought victims of crime should have the right to tell offenders the impact of their crime; 94% believe offenders should make amends by doing unpaid work in the community; and 71% believe the victim should have a say in how the offender should make amends for the harm they have caused.

Oct 17, 2011 , , , , , ,

Texas achieves dramatic results in criminal justice reform

from the press release from Right on Crime (hat tip to Grits for Breakfast):

Right on Crime and the Texas Public Policy Foundation (TPPF) today released two policy briefs regarding Texas' extensive criminal justice reforms in juvenile and adult corrections. Over the last decade, the groups' policy advisors have been instrumental in working with the Texas legislature and Governor Rick Perry to overhaul the state's corrections system.

"For the first time in state history, Texas closed a prison because we don't need it anymore," said Marc Levin, Senior Policy Advisor to Right on Crime, who also serves as the Director of the Center for Effective Justice at the Texas Public Policy Foundation.  "The reforms that were first adopted in Texas have stimulated similar initiatives across the nation in South Carolina, Kentucky, Georgia, Ohio, Arkansas, and other states.  Crime has dropped in Texas since the changes and taxpayers have saved more than a billion dollars from not building new prisons.  We believe these commonsense policies, which were supported by 'tough and smart on crime' conservatives and are outlined in these reports, can serve as an effective model for other states."

Oct 14, 2011 , ,

An apology is not good enough and neither is a conviction

from the independent review of the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Playoffs riot:

Accountability is most powerful when an individual fully understands the effects of their actions on other people and not just the impersonal state.

Some did as soon as they woke up the next day, bewildered and remorseful. Bold acts that drew cheers on the 15th were inexplicable and humiliating on the 16th. Even many of those who felt no remorse felt the lash of global village justice in all its forms.

Remorse, no matter how sincere, is not enough. We had a deal: we respected them and they respected us. They broke that deal on June 15 (albeit impulsively in many cases) and a price must be paid. There are strong and widespread views that the criminal justice system is not up to the task because it is too slow and too weak. But another, more apt reason is that it is too impersonal. A guilty plea and imposition of a fine teaches nothing of the harm that’s been done.

Sep 13, 2011 , , , , ,

Alberta solicitor general to fight for restorative justice

from the article at CBC News:

Alberta's solicitor general is vowing to fight to restore funding for restorative justice programs in the face of mounting criticism from his party and a retired chief justice.

"I will fight to restore it," Frank Oberle told CBC News. "I'm going to fight to restore the grant money next year."

Oberle said he was forced to eliminate the $350,000 grant for the program to reach budget targets.

His department is responsible for jails in Alberta and most of his budget is taken up by salaries where there is no room to cut.

Sep 07, 2011 , , ,

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