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Showing 10 posts filed under: Policy [–] [Show all]

Interview with Jon Collins, Restorative Justice Council CEO

from the Restorative Justice Council website:

“While there’s quite a lot of support for restorative justice now within the criminal justice context, I think that there’s work to do at the national level in other sectors - for example, in education, in care homes, in other areas where people come into conflict - to make sure that restorative practices can be rolled out across all those areas.”

Sep 10, 2014 , , ,

Protective Behaviours: A new approach to being safe

from the blog entry by Liz Bates on Health Education Service:

There is a difference between telling children and young people what is a dangerous situation or dangerous behaviour, and helping them to recognise for them selves what it means to feel safe or unsafe.

Sep 05, 2014 ,

Does ‘restorative justice’ in campus sexual assault cases make sense?

from the article by Meg Mott in the Washington Post:

It makes sense that victim advocates put personal safety above all other considerations. They meet her when she is most distraught. But that particular emotional reality, while very big, is not necessarily permanent. In cases of acquaintance rape, the urge to be protected from the offender often competes with the equally strong urge to be heard.

Sep 04, 2014 , , ,

Justice in Ferguson, Missouri: Can restorative justice apply here?

from Lisa Rea's blog entry at Restorative Justice International:

I have worked in the area of civil rights in the past. I include my restorative justice work in the last 20 years as being part of that civil rights work. 

But in the 1980s I also served on a local civil rights coalition in the Sacramento area in California where our focus was to respond to acts of racial hatred in the region. This included acts of racial violence and intimidation by the Ku Klux Klan and the neo-Nazi party. 

Sep 01, 2014 , , , , ,

The criminalization of black youth and the rise of restorative justice

from the article by Max Eternity in Truthout:

Among extrajudicial deaths at the hands of police and white vigilantes, the tragic stories of Travon Martin and Oscar Grant have garnered media attention, but are also highly contested narratives. Less talked about is the institutionalized climate of fear that has been normalized for brown-skinned youth - the daily domestic terror by police.

....[This] insidious institutional problem continues to unfold. We examine it in... an on-site interview with Chief Allen Nance - the chief probation officer of San Francisco's Juvenile Hall - on June 13, 2014.

Aug 19, 2014 , ,

Face to face with victims: Boulder County to expand restorative justice

from the article on Daily Camera Boulder County News: 

As a prosecutor, Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett is a big believer in the American court system. But even Garnett admits there are times when months of hearings and drawn-out jury trials aren't the answer — especially in the case of adolescents.

"That may make sense for a murder case, but it doesn't make sense for a kid knocking a mailbox off its post," Garnett said.

His office will be one of four in Colorado participating in a state pilot program to help youths stay out of the court system — even the juvenile court system — and resolve their cases through restorative justice. Over the next few months, Garnett and his staff will be working on opening the 20th Judicial District Attorney's Center of Prevention and Restorative Justice.

Jul 24, 2014 , , ,

Another road to justice

from the article in Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal Sentinel:

The group of men listens, mesmerized, as Lynn BeBeau talks about the last time she saw her husband alive.

"I told him the same thing I always did: `I love you. Be careful.' "

Her husband grinned back.

"Honey, don't worry about me. Me and God are like this." He held up two crossed fingers and smiled.

Hours later, the Eau Claire police officer was shot to death in the line of duty.

The hulking men in prison greens sit perfectly still as BeBeau fights back tears. They are murderers, armed robbers, drug dealers, child molesters.

Jul 16, 2014 , , , ,

Breaking a vicious cycle [Editorial]

from the article in the Baltimore Sun:

For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.

Jul 15, 2014 , ,

Restorative Conferencing Changes Rotten Behavior

from the article on Spacewhat:

The mom and her 15-year-old son are so palpably nervous you can almost see anxiety ions in the air.  He’s committed a seriously foolish act.  He and Mom want to cooperate with a restorative conference as an alternative to his getting arrested.

He’s not a bad kid, but like so many kids these days — and so many adults as well — the rules don’t really apply to him.  While immature and a goofball, his antics can be funny, some of the time.  But the joking can also be irritating, disruptive and obnoxious.  This time Goofball crossed a line, a personal violation, that freaked a teacher out to the point where she considered pressing charges — and had every right to do so.  But his behavior was not malicious.

Jul 03, 2014 ,

Restorative justice in education – possibilities, but also concerns

from the blog article by Kathy Evans:

There is a great deal of momentum right now for implementing restorative justice in education. This makes me incredibly excited – and a bit nervous.

Let’s start with the good news! RJ is gaining lots of attention in education. Recently, the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education came together to issue a colleague letter alerting schools that they can be cited for disproportionately disciplining students in certain categories. These federal agencies then recommended restorative justice as one way to address disproportionate discipline in schools!

Jun 27, 2014 ,

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