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Showing 10 posts filed under: Region: North America and Caribbean [–], Policy [–] [Show all]

Philly to host first-ever ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ youth hackathon next week

from the article by Juliana Reyes in Technical.ly Philly:

Minority youth will become civic hackers at the first “My Brother’s Keeper” hackathon next week.

It’s a response to President Obama’s call to action for organizations to help black boys succeed. Though the hackathon is geared toward boys, girls are also welcome. Participants will build apps around “education, wellness, restorative justice, food, sustainability and masculinity,” according to a release.

Nov 13, 2014 , , , ,

Peace room trumps suspensions at Lincoln Park High School

from the article by Paul Biasco on DNAinfo Chicago:

During his seven years as assistant principal at Kenwood Academy, Michael Boraz learned to believe that punitive justice was the way to a disciplined and well-oiled school.

The idea of a "peace circle" to handle problems rather than a five-day suspension or even a transfer was almost laughable to him.

Oct 22, 2014 , , ,

Merced County high schools see the benefits of restorative justice discipline model

from the article by Ana B. Ibarra in the Merced Sun Star:

High school officials in Merced County are taking a new approach at improving discipline policies on campuses, and that approach is showing a significant improvement in student participation and wellness, according to a new report.

Restorative justice policies, which focus on non-adversarial and dialogue-based decisionmaking, are proving to be more effective than zero-tolerance practices, school officials said during a presentation last week.

Oct 10, 2014 , , ,

Restoring justice: Sonoma County and beyond

from the article by John Beck in Sonomoa County Gazette:

Last summer, when the Santa Rosa City Schools District was looking for a way to curb the fourth highest rate of suspensions in the state, it turned to restorative justice as the solution.

“We were almost an outlier,” said Jen Klose, Santa City Schools board member. “We had truly become zero tolerance.”

Searching for a new paradigm for discipline, Santa Rosa City Schools board president Bill Carle said, “We started focusing on how do we do this in a different way, and that’s when we found restorative justice.”

Oct 06, 2014 , , , , ,

Justice in Ferguson, Missouri: Can restorative justice apply here?

from Lisa Rea's blog entry at Restorative Justice International:

I have worked in the area of civil rights in the past. I include my restorative justice work in the last 20 years as being part of that civil rights work. 

But in the 1980s I also served on a local civil rights coalition in the Sacramento area in California where our focus was to respond to acts of racial hatred in the region. This included acts of racial violence and intimidation by the Ku Klux Klan and the neo-Nazi party. 

Sep 01, 2014 , , , , ,

Another road to justice

from the article in Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal Sentinel:

The group of men listens, mesmerized, as Lynn BeBeau talks about the last time she saw her husband alive.

"I told him the same thing I always did: `I love you. Be careful.' "

Her husband grinned back.

"Honey, don't worry about me. Me and God are like this." He held up two crossed fingers and smiled.

Hours later, the Eau Claire police officer was shot to death in the line of duty.

The hulking men in prison greens sit perfectly still as BeBeau fights back tears. They are murderers, armed robbers, drug dealers, child molesters.

Jul 16, 2014 , , , ,

Breaking a vicious cycle [Editorial]

from the article in the Baltimore Sun:

For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.

Jul 15, 2014 , ,

Close to Home: Success of restorative program shows in numbers

from the article in the Press Democrat:

Last October, after the Santa Rosa City Council approved funding to introduce restorative practices in schools, The Press Democrat ran an editorial that stated, “Spending $125,000 on a one-year pilot program is a lot to ask — especially for the Santa Rosa City Schools District. But in this case, it's money well spent.”

Jun 10, 2014 , , ,

Practicing restorative justice at Oakland's Skyline High

from the article by Sarah O'Neal:

Sonia Black is walking through the halls of Skyline High School, trying to get the last few kids to class.

Black is in charge of discipline and attendance for ninth and twelfth graders at Skyline. She’s been at the school for two years and this year, they’re trying something new: restorative justice.

“The whole idea of restorative justice is, how can we make this situation right so you don’t have to come up and see me anymore?” says Black. “We want to have a conversation about what’s going on and what we can do to resolve this so that the student is in the classroom learning and the teacher is able to teach.”

Jun 05, 2014 , , ,

Restorative justice for everyone: An innovative program and case study from Turners Falls High School in Massachusetts

from the article by David Bulley and Thomas Osborn:

Restorative Justice generally exists as an alternative to traditional discipline. In most schools a student who acts out will be referred to the assistant principal or to the dean of students who then makes a determination: Is the student a candidate for restorative justice or should they be disciplined the traditional way of detentions or suspensions? Often this includes a choice by the student. In fact, as part of most restorative conferences, the perpetrator is informed that participation is voluntary and that at any time they can opt out and subject themselves to traditional justice. One problem with this system is that too many students welcome an out of school suspension.

Apr 17, 2014 , , ,

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