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Showing 10 posts filed under: Other [–], Victim [–] [Show all]

What if we gave victims of serious crimes the opportunity to face the offenders?

from the article by Robb Davis in the People's Vanguard of Davis:

There has been much speculation about the factors that might lead someone to commit the kind of crime that was perpetrated against Mikey Partida.  While some of it may be premature it is a normal human response to try to make sense of something that is so senseless.

….Lisa Rea, founder of Restorative Justice International, who has worked in restorative justice since 1992 believes that victims of crime do not want some vague sense of "closure" but rather they want to regain a sense of safety, security and healing.  She argues in a 2012 article[1] that for many victims the healing process would be facilitated by an opportunity to face the offender, ask him/her questions, describe the harm that was done, and seek a way for the harms done to them to be made right.  She notes: "...(T)hroughout my work the number of victims who are seeking to participate in some kind of restorative justice dialogue is increasing."

Apr 12, 2013 , ,

Why go there?

from the entry by Peg Wallace for Wisconsin Restorative Justice Coalition:

That’s the question that arises most often when I mention my visits with inmates in Wisconsin’s prison system.  Why go there?  Why would I, who lost a beloved family member to violent crime, want to “go there”—emotionally, let alone physically?  Why do I spend three consecutive days of my discretionary time locked in intense conversation with convicted felons, many of whom have committed violent crimes?  Why would anyone want to do that?

My own journey to prison began over 25 years ago, when my 88-year-old grandmother and her two elderly friends were kidnapped after attending a charity event in my home town.  Their kidnapper drove them to an isolated, wooded location and brutally kick-boxed them to death.  Within days, he was captured, and within months, he was tried and convicted.

Jan 18, 2013 , ,

Evaluation of The Forgiveness Project within prisons

from the article by Joanna R. Adler and Mansoor Mir:

The Forgiveness Project (TFP) is a UK based charity that uses real stories to explore how ideas around forgiveness, reconciliation and conflict resolution can have a positive impact on people’s lives. One aspect of the charity’s work is a programme run within prisons, targeted at the early stages of a sentence.

Dec 07, 2012 , , , , ,

Unite offering prisoner mediation service at Kirklevington Grange Prison

from the article by Sandy McKenzie in the Evening Gazette:

....Mr James said the focus was always on the long-term goal of reducing reoffending. “We’re also providing a victim-offender mediation service for those Kirklevington prisoners who agree to talk to their victims and where the victim agrees to meet the perpetrator.

“This is one way a prisoner can show they have taken responsibility for their actions. They may want to offer an explanation to the victim. They may want to say sorry and agree a way to make amends.”

Nov 28, 2012 , , , , , ,

Restorative justice behind bars

from the article by Stacy Howard on the Criminal Justice section of Seattle University's website:

This summer, Seattle University's Criminal Justice program took students out of the classroom and into prison cells. SU’s criminal justice chair and a sociology professor teamed up to create a new pilot course that provided a unique learning experience for students.

Sep 14, 2012 , , , ,

Power of One: Restorative justice couples victims with offenders

from the article on CTV.ca:

....A woman named Marité has been taking part in the process, not by facing her sexually-abusive father, but rather, another man who committed similar acts.

She said that results have helped her cope with the damage she suffered.

"For him it was like I was his daughter," said Marité. "And I was able also to express my anger to him and that's what he wanted rather than silence from his daughter."

"I can now go forward because I'm not bound to my father anymore. I can leave him go."

Jun 26, 2012 , , , , , , , ,

Restorative justice: Using psychology to change the way offenders think

from the article on the website of the British Psychological Society:

A five-day programme for convicted offenders has been shown to be effective in increasing their levels of concern for their victims and motivation to change. The Supporting Offenders through Restoration Inside (SORI) programme, which has been piloted in seven prisons across the UK, is the subject of a study published in the journal Criminological and Legal Psychology today.

Jun 13, 2012 , , , ,

New Staffordshire crime-fighting partnership praised by Justice Secretary

from the article by Sonya Britton iin This Is Staffordshire

On a visit to Staffordshire's new integrated crime-fighting hub, Justice Secretary Lord McNally met former offenders, victims of crime, and staff from police, probation and drug treatment agencies.

And Lord McNally was impressed at the joint working shown by the 180° Integrated Offender Management partnership, which aims to help tackle the most challenging and prolific offenders in Staffordshire in an integrated way.

Jun 08, 2012 , , , , , , ,

The three different levels of Restorative Justice

From the article in the Sentinel:

Level One is for minor offences or non-criminal incidents like anti-social behaviour, which can be dealt with immediately by the officer at the scene.

All Staffordshire officers are being trained in this area.

May 15, 2012 , , , , , ,

Who are you? Karen Lang

from Alicia Hanson's article on abc.net.au:

"Imagine you are shopping at Garden City - you are trying to find an appropriate jumper for your daughter. It has to have a high neck. Something that will compliment her blonde hair and fair skin. You know she would want to look her best. Finally you find a soft mauve high neck jumper, you know it will look beautiful on her. You clutch your purchase and contain yourself till you reach your car - where you break into sobs. The jumper is for your daughter to wear in the casket - there will be a viewing and the high neck is to cover her wounds. You will never shop at Garden City again without thinking of her. Imagine." - Karen Lang

May 11, 2012 , , , ,

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