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Showing 10 posts filed under: Practice [–] [Show all]

Applying a restorative justice approach to student conduct

from the article by Daniel Fusch in Academic Impressions:

....Taking an RJ approach requires a philosophical shift for the student conduct office – it entails new sets of questions for student conduct hearings and an alert ear for cases in which there is the possibility to restore harm that’s been done, rather than simply (or only) penalize.

....To learn more about how to make a restorative justice program most successful, we interviewed two officials from Colorado State University, which has frequently been recognized for its restorative justice and other student conduct programs. The two officials are Paul Osincup and Melissa Emerson, the associate and assistant directors of conflict resolution and student conduct services at CSU. Paul Osincup holds student conduct hearings; Melissa Emerson manages the restorative justice process once a student has been referred as a likely RJ candidate.

Mar 06, 2012 , , ,

Review: Restorative justice in practice: Evaluating what works for victims and offenders.

Joanna Shapland, Gwen Robinson, and Angela Sorsby (2011). Restorative justice in practice: Evaluating what works for victims and offenders. Oxford, UK: Taulor & Francis Group Ltd. Paperback. 227 pages.

by Eric Assur

Three British criminology researchers and educators, affiliated with the University of Sheffield, have offered a very rich book on the use of victim-offender mediation programs (what they call schemes) in adult criminal justice venues in England. 

Most early Restorative Justice (RJ) writing has focused on juvenile justice programs, generally with a concentration on diversionary approaches for first time offenders. The Shapland, Robinson and Sorsby book looks exclusively and intensely at three ‘schemes’ and several hundred ‘cases’ involving adults. The criminal justice programs they studied were funded by the British Ministry of Justice – Home Office between 2001 and 2008.  They worked with adults at arrest, while going through the courts and even with some while imprisoned.  

Mar 02, 2012 , , , , , , , ,

More action needed to bolster good behavior

from the article by Alan J. Borsuk in the Journel Sentinel:

I don't know exactly what happened during a funeral at a church at N. 53rd and W. Burleigh streets last Tuesday, but I know it was bad.

I know a lot more about what happened in the library at Bradley Tech High School the next morning, and I know it was good.

Mar 01, 2012 , , , ,

New York Times article shows why restorative justice is needed

from the entry by Lorenn Walker on Restorative Justice & Other Public Health Approaches for Healing:

The February 5, 2012 New York Times article by Kovaleski et al, For Killers’ Families, Struggles With Shame, Silence and Fear shows why we need restorative justice.

The article describes how family members are also harmed by their loved one’s criminal behavior. It shows the need for restorative interventions that can help many families deal with the harm they suffer.

Feb 16, 2012 , , ,

Ford launches restorative justice guide for young people

from the article on Northern Ireland Executive:

Justice Minister David Ford has launched an innovative new guide to restorative justice for young people. The booklet entitled “Restorative Justice - a guide for young people” was produced by the Youth Justice Agency in collaboration with the Restorative Justice Forum (NI).  

Launched during a Restorative Justice Forum seminar in Parliament Buildings, the child friendly guide uses a comic book format to explain how restorative justice can be used in a variety of settings including the youth conference.  

Feb 14, 2012 , , , ,

Restorative justice: The new way forward

from Lisa Rea's article in Baylor University's Christian Refelction issue on Prison:

.... Some might argue that our prison system was never meant to positively affect victims and communities. I will not analyze the original purpose of prisons in society, but we know that prisons have become something far different than what they were intended to be. Most societies have incarcerated individuals who were deemed to be a violent threat to others, but the United States prison system today has grown immensely beyond this rationale. As a result, the American state and federal prison population has expanded dramatically. 

Feb 07, 2012 , , , ,

Review: A community-based approach to the reduction of sexual re-offending: circles of support and accountability

A community-based approach to the reduction of sexual re-offending: circles of support and accountability. Stephen Hanvey, Terry Philpot and Chris Wilson. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2011. 192 pp. £19.99. ISBN 978-1-84905-198-9 (pbk) 

by Martin Wright

Often sex offenders are isolated people who have difficulty making relationships, and when they come out of prison the double stigma of prison and the nature of their offence isolates them still more – an extra hardship for them, and an increased risk that they will revert to their previous behaviour. So the idea of forming a circle of support for them is both humane and a safeguard. It does not fall under the usual definition of restorative justice, because it does not include dialogue with the victim, which would in many cases be unwanted and/or inappropriate. It does however restore or even improve the situation of the offender, and it involves members of the community. 

Feb 01, 2012 , , , , , , , ,

Young vandals ordered to put Somerset factory damage right

from the article in the Western Gazette:

A gang of youths who broke into a Castle Cary factory have been ordered to make amends by washing site windows and picking up rubbish by a restorative justice panel.

A three-month police campaign which tracked down 14 children involved with causing £1,000 of damage to the Torbay Road factory ended last month.

Jan 30, 2012 , , , ,

Twenty years of restorative justice in New Zealand

from the article by Fred W.M. McElrea in Tikkun:

As I look back over the last twenty years, the following aspects of the family group conference system stand out as being both innovative and of potential value to adult systems as well:

Jan 23, 2012 , , , , , ,

Learning from Rwanda

from the article by John H. Stanfield, II in Tikkun:

....How do you mend a country when intimates killed intimates in such tightly knitted communities? How do you do justice when thousands of people were perpetrators and where you only have so much prison space? How do you do it?

Rwanda is doing it through a largely homegrown restorative justice methodology.

Jan 20, 2012 , , , , ,

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