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Showing 10 posts filed under: Practice [–] [Show all]

Restorative justice approach to schoolboy assault

from the Nottinghamshire Police webpage:

A new approach to resolving criminal matters has been used to deal with an assault on a Nottingham schoolboy.

A 14-year-old pupil collapsed after he was assaulted in a classroom by a fellow schoolboy at the National Church of England Academy on 22 September 2011.

Jan 13, 2012 , , , , ,

Restorative justice and coercion

by Lynette Parker:

Recently, I had a brief Twitter conversation with HMP_Chaplain about restorative justice and coercion. HMP_Chaplain commented on a statement by a Sycamore Tree Project facilitator in England and Wales that “if they make RJ compulsory she will pull out." I responded in a couple of Tweets:

“Can understand...voluntariness is essential in RJ. Coercion can stand in the way of dialogue but doesn’t have to.”

“Also RJ is more than a process its a way of thinking that can inform all interactions with offenders.”

Jan 06, 2012 , , , , ,

Women key in making peace

from the article by Yvette Moore:

...."The first thing that came to my mind was, ‘Wow, finally an acknowledgement that, first, we [women] are the ones that bare the greatest brunt of all of the world’s conflicts,’” Ms. [Lehmah] Gbowee said, sharing her initial reactions to the news she and two other women had received the [2011 Nobel Peace Prize].

Jan 02, 2012 , , , , ,

Moving beyond sides: The power and potential of a new public safety policy paradigm

from the executive summary by David Rogers and Kerry Naughton:

Many factors have shaped state and federal public safety policies in the United States over the past twenty-five years. The most notable influence has been the widespread adoption of a tough on crime philosophy. While there is now a wealth of research that shows that tough on crime policies are not the most effective approach to public safety and actually create a serious opportunity-cost for reducing crime and victimization, the tough on crime philosophy has become part of the political and public consciousness across the United States. 

Dec 22, 2011 , , ,

Letting victims define justice

from the article by Steve Sullivan for Restorative Justice Week 2011:

....There is a growing myth that for victims, justice requires tougher penalties. If only it was that simple. There is no evidence that punishment is as important to the majority of victims as some would have us believe. When asked in one study why they reported the crime, sexual assault victims listed punishment of the offender very low on their list of priorities.

Dec 21, 2011 , , , ,

Review: Child victims and restorative justice: A needs-rights model

Tall Gal. Child victims and restorative justice: A needs-rights review. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. 264 pp.

from the article by Bill Lyons in Law & Politics Review:

....Combining the right to participate from the Convention on the Rights of the Child with an empirical analysis of a child's need to regain control, participation emerges as a critically important need and right for at least three reasons. First, for immediate instrumental reasons, participation is both an immediate coping mechanism and is expected to improve criminal justice outcomes. Second, for longer term developmental reasons, meaningful participation in experiential learning opportunities is a developmental step toward empowering young adults to master the problem solving skills necessary to make democracy both possible and desirable.

Dec 19, 2011 , , , , , ,

Choosing to change: Transitioning to the transformative model in a community mediation center

from the chapter by Jody B. Miller in Transformative Mediation: A sourcebook:

Understanding that transitioning to the transformative framework would be a long journey, we committed to that path. As a staff, we began to attend trainings and apply what we learned to cases at the Center. We attended our first transformative Mediation Training in 2001, with Baruch Bush, Sally Pope, and Judy Saul, and it became clear what had been missing: a mediation practice grounded in premises and principles about people in conflict. 

It all began to make sense when we came to understand that crisis is a conflict in human interaction, and that conflict has an effect on one’s ability to stay strong in self and connected to others. I had been a practicing mediator for more than 11 years and it was the first time that I learned mediation from a theoretical perspective – one that articulated clear underlying beliefs about people and their abilities, conflict and its effects, as well as what our purpose as mediators was and what it wasn’t. 

Dec 08, 2011 , ,

A review of the Youth Justice System in Northern Ireland

from the report by the Department of Justice Northern Ireland:

One of the most positive developments to have arisen out of Northern Ireland’s recent history is the expansion of rich and varied restorative practices. Restorative approaches have been used to respond to offending and anti-social behaviour, family disputes, disruptive behaviour in schools and children’s homes and in helping prisoners reintegrate back into their communities. Early teething problems have been largely overcome and professional practice in restorative justice in Northern Ireland is now internationally recognised.

Dec 01, 2011 , , , , , , ,

Don't send that email. Pick up the phone!

from Anthony K. Tjan's entry on HBR Blog Network:

Like many readers, I have experienced too many unproductive strings of back-and-forth emails or texts that should have stopped in round two, but continue. The problems with trying to resolve sensitive matters over email or text are quite obvious:

Nov 28, 2011 , ,

Different types of restorative justice circles and a practitioner perspective

from the entry by Kris Miner on Restorative Justice and Circles:

Just as there are 12 major markings on the face of a clock, I could list 12 different kinds of Circles.  In four basic categories those Circles would be community building – peace building – repair building – and celebration.  This also creates a full circle!

A very brief explanation on these four categories, followed by a practitioner perspective.  All these Circles use the 4 stages and phases I have written about on this blog.  You use good Circlekeeping skills and techniques for each of these.

Nov 25, 2011 ,

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