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Showing 10 posts filed under: Country:USA [–] [Show all]

Restorative justice focuses on the victim

from the column by Linda Gryczan in the Independent Record:

....There is a growing number of restorative justice programs in Montana for adults and juveniles across reservations and other jurisdictions in Montana, including community youth justice, victim-offender dialogue and victim impact panels.

In Lewis and Clark and Broadwater counties, certain first time offenders up to age 17, are offered an opportunity to instead of going before a judge, meet with the victim of their crime, his or her parents, community members and a trained facilitator. Victims are encouraged to describe the impact of the crime, offenders are held accountable, and the group decides how the offender will make amends.

Mar 29, 2012 , , ,

Utah’s mental health court addresses repeat offender problems

from Jason Nowa's article on Voices of Utah:

Sim Gill believes that jail is for people who have murdered, raped, or who harm children and not a place for the mentally ill. He is currently in the process of trying to accomplish this.

Gill, who is the Salt Lake County District Attorney, recently spoke to small group of University of Utah students on about his job and the passions that drive him. Gill spoke about various processes,  from how he deals with the death penalty, drug abuse and to the mentally ill committing crimes. The United States jails more people than any other country in the world, he said. Gill estimated around 2.2 million people in the United States are currently incarcerated.

Mar 27, 2012 , , ,

Chicago Public School students face racial discipline gap: Education Department

from the entry by Joy Resmovits on huffingtonpost.com

In Chicago public schools, black students receive harsher punishments for in-school infractions than white students, a fact that mirrors a nationwide trend, according to data released by the U.S. Department of Education Tuesday. The report paints a startling picture of racial disparities in how students are disciplined in schools across the country.

Mar 22, 2012 , , ,

In Dharun Ravi trial, criminal retribution will not serve justice

from the Guest Column by Joseph C. d'Oronzio in the Star-Ledger:

I watch with increasing discomfort as the arch of justice sways with uncertainty in that New Brunswick courtroom where the fate of former Rutgers University freshman Dharun Ravi is being considered.

Mar 15, 2012 , , , , ,

Legislature approves restorative justice for juvenile offenders

from the release from the House Democratic Caucus:

The state Senate voted 48-0 today to authorize a new evidence-based judicial option that encourages juvenile offenders to take responsibility for their actions and promotes a better understanding of how crimes impact victims.

Mar 13, 2012 , , , , ,

A view from behind bars: School of Theology and Ministry exhibition showcases artwork by American prisoners

from the article in The Boston College Chronicle:

An exhibition of more than 40 works of art that depict images of grief and hope created by men imprisoned in American jails and penitentiaries will open at the School of Theology and Ministry on March 15.

“Seeing the Man: Art From Behind Bars, A Vision of Restorative Justice and Healing” will be on display through April 30 in the Atrium Gallery of the STM Library, located at 117 Lake Street on Brighton Campus. The works of art are provided by Do-Right Ministries, a non-profit organization that raises awareness about the American justice system and promotes healing through art.

Mar 12, 2012 , , ,

Leicestershire Pc Sandie to give US cops policing lesson

from the article in This Is Leicestershire:

New York State's police are to get a lesson in policing from a county copper.

Pc Sandie Hastings will be heading across the Atlantic for a two-week stint with a US police department to teach its officers about restorative justice.

The 58-year-old has been responsible for training her Leicestershire colleagues – and thousands from other British forces – in the concept, in which offenders are made to put right the consequences of their crimes rather than face court action.

She will explain the idea to the officers of Rochester Police Department, who patrol the city with the highest per capita homicide rate in New York State.

Feb 23, 2012 , , , , , ,

Priest's slaying in Birmingham to be remembered in church service

from the article by Greg Garrison in the Birmingham News:

The 1921 slaying of a Catholic priest in Birming­ham by a Methodist min­­ister will be the subject of repentance during a 6:30 p.m. Ash Wednesday service at Highlands United Meth­odist Church, 1045 20th Street South, led by United Methodist Bishop William Willimon.

"It's going to be a power­ful and a historic event," said Jim Pinto, director of the Father James E. Coyle Memorial Project. "We're not going to live in the past, but we want to more fully understand the past."

Feb 22, 2012 , , ,

Restorative Justice: Differences between the US and UK

from Scott Walsh's entry on From the Desk of Mary Ellen Johnson:

First: Politics

This is one more area where the UK and the US are miles apart. In the United States prosecutors often go into politics as a career so being strong on crime and talking the rhetoric helps in their campaigns. To have any chance of moving forward all political parties need to be targeted at the same time, there is little point in persuading one politician or political party to be more understanding as this will just leave the door open for his or her opposition to jump in with the policy they are stronger on crime and sentencing. 

They also need to be tackled at the right time; your political system seems to run on a four year cycle. There is very little point in lobbying any politicians to be more compassionate towards offenders in the final 2 years of any administration as they will not want to seem weak on the crime ticket and also be already campaigning for the next elections. The day after any vote is the day to start.

Feb 21, 2012 , , , ,

UC explores restorative justice in improving campus climate

from Harry Mok's article in UC Newsroom:

A residence hall fire alarm is pulled as a drunken prank in the middle of the night. A fellow resident, who happens to be gay, witnesses it and confronts the culprit as the building is evacuated. In the exchange of words, the prankster utters a pejorative term for a homosexual man in a profanity-laced tirade.

Fortunately, the situation was just part of a role-playing exercise. Twenty-three student affairs staff members, from all 10 University of California campuses, took part in training for restorative justice, a conflict resolution process that UC is considering for use when dealing with incidents of intolerance or hate, particularly for conduct that, while offensive, may not violate any laws or policies.

Feb 20, 2012 , , ,

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