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Showing 10 posts filed under: Country:USA [–] [Show all]

Crime and entertainment at Franklin High

from the article by Rick Holmes in MetroWest Daily News:

When outrage-inducing incidents become media sensations, the authorities respond with the tools they have available. Educators point to politically popular “zero tolerance” policies. 

....Police charge the thugs with whatever laws they can find — even unlawful wire tapping — and set the wheels of justice turning. There will be lawyers and hearings and plea bargains, fines and probably time behind bars.

May 23, 2012 , , , , ,

Art helps heal crime's wounds

from the article by Howard Zehr in the Philadelphia Inquirer:

I admit it. Sometimes I have Philly envy. Philadelphia has a Mural Arts Program, and the community in which I live does not. 

....I have been drawn to the arts as a way of reframing the challenges of crime and trauma. The arts can engage the whole person to express or understand the harm done and help harness heart and intelligence to reduce isolation. The arts can provide a way to explore what can be done to give back, and to give voice to the full range of human experience. The act of creation can restore a sense of meaning and agency to those who harmed and those who have been harmed.

May 22, 2012 , , ,

Smart on crime: Why reforming criminal justice is now a Conservative issue

from the article in The Economist:

....It is not only in Britain that criminal-justice reform has become a right-wing issue. The Right on Crime initiative, a creation of the Texas Public Policy Foundation, a think-tank, counts leading Republicans such as Newt Gingrich and Jeb Bush among the fans of its campaign to divert more offenders from prisons to non-custodial sentences. Half of all American states voted to reduce the use of custody last year.

There is plenty of room for relaxation in punitive America, which locks up almost one in 100 people (England and Wales put away fewer than one in 500). But similar forces are at work in both places. Fiscal pressure is mounting. Overall crime rates are falling. And stubborn reoffending rates suggest that some things are not working.

Prisons are one of them. 

May 21, 2012 , , , , ,

First Nations Court opens in North Vancouver

from the article by Todd Coyne in the North Shore Outlook:

The judge is out of her usual judging clothes and the court sheriff wears no gun.

It’s not immediately apparent — not at first — if these are just oversights, but when Judge Joanne Challenger turns from the convicted man to the packed public gallery and asks for any suggestions on sentencing and the hands go up, it becomes clear: First Nations Court is different.

May 16, 2012 , , , , , ,

Angel Ruelas pleads guilty to murder of Pacific Grove teen

from the story by Virginia Hennessey for the Mercury News:

The brother of murder victim Kristopher Eric Olinger and the man who unexpectedly admitted killing the Monterey High School student hope to find some peace as part of the "restorative justice" program.

Angel Ruelas' plea Tuesday was a stunning development that came nearly 15 years after Olinger's horrific murder, six years after the defendant's arrest and moments before a pool of prospective jurors were brought into the courtroom for trial.

May 14, 2012 , , ,

Growing past hate: 'Restorative justice' helps heal pain from teens' vandalism

from the article by Fred Van Liew in the DesMoines Register:

In March of 1994 members of the Temple B’nai Jeshurun in Des Moines awoke to find neo-Nazi graffiti scrawled on the side of their synagogue. There were no immediate suspects, but there was anguish, anger and outrage.

May 09, 2012 , , , , ,

Rare legal settlements demand officers pay too

from the article by Steve Mills in the Chicago Tribune:

To settle a wrongful-conviction lawsuit against the Chicago police, the city recently agreed to pay Harold Hill $1.25 million.

What never became public was that, to reach the settlement late last year, two detectives in the case that sent Hill to prison for 12 years for a rape and murder he insisted he did not commit agreed to contribute, too. It was not much next to the total settlement — $7,500 each — yet it apparently meant something to Hill.

May 04, 2012 , , ,

Cultural Conundrums: Sorry to have made you apologize

from the article by Kate Elwood in Daily Yomiuri Online:

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, comedians Mike Myers and Dana Carvey often appeared in the guise of two wacky yet lovable metal-loving loafers named Wayne and Garth. At the start of each "Wayne's World" sketch on NBC's Saturday Night Live, Garth greeted Wayne saying, "Party on, Wayne!" and Wayne replied, "Party on, Garth!" "Party on" soon became a popular catchphrase for glib salutations. I hadn't thought of Wayne's World or the revelry-advocating refrain for a long time, but recently a spontaneous adaptation of it--"Sorry on!"--popped into my head when thinking about a recent experience of someone I'll call Carey.

May 03, 2012 , , ,

Restorative justice in higher education: A compilation of formats and best practices

from the guide by Justine Darling:

....There are many restorative tools and processes that can be used in the university setting. This guide is specific to Judicial and Residential Life processes within Institutions of Higher Education. Addressed below are the five most common methods of implementation that are used at the 9 colleges and universities in this study. The goal of all 5 Restorative Processes is for the respondent to acknowledge responsibility, identify harm and obligations, and develop a restorative plan agreed upon by the person responsible and impacted parties. Language used in Restorative Judicial Processes is different than the language used in Traditional Judicial Processes so that stigmatization is less likely to occur.

Apr 30, 2012 , , , , ,

Meeting the murderer: Profile of victim-offender dialogue facilitator

from the entry on Grits for Breakfast:

See an interesting article from the Christian Science Monitor about a boat builder from Maine who runs a non-profit facilitating victim-offender dialogue (VOD) between violent criminals and their victims or their families, which is an idea derived from "restorative justice" models. 

Apr 27, 2012 , , , , , ,

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