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Showing 10 posts filed under: Victim [–] [Show all]

Victim impact programming in corrections: A team approach to reducing recidivism

from the note by Verna Wyatt in The Wall:

At first glance, it might seem counter-intuitive for victim advocates to work with inmates. However, the truth is, victim advocates and corrections professionals are not adversaries. We actually share a common goal: “no more victims.” Conducting Victim Impact classes for the incarcerated is a team approach to preventing victimization. There have been several studies looking at the effectiveness of victim impact programs across the country. A Iowa Department of Correction report, using two evidence-based studies, concluded victim impact is a contributing factor in reducing recidivism.

[You Have the Power (YHTP)] developed our own Victim Impact Curriculum based on our experience as victim advocates. We’ve learned from our class participants that the majority of offenders never think about their victim as a human being. Many never even think about their victim at all. One of our offender participants told us, “I’ve been incarcerated for over twenty years, and I never once thought about my victim until this class.”

Apr 25, 2011 , , ,

Forgiveness and reconciliation is topic of PBS documentary of U.N. humanitarian

from Blair Howell's article in th Deseret News:

“When you don’t forgive others, you keep building a hell inside yourself.”

Rose Mapendo remembers the horrors she endured in her native Congo — beatings, rapes, tortures, being forced to watch the execution of her husband. And giving birth to their twins inside a death camp cell, cutting the umbilical cords with a stick. Yet she is a forceful advocate of forgiveness and reconciliation.

....The documentary’s title refers to a quote from Mapendo: “One person alone cannot push an elephant, but many people together can.”

Apr 22, 2011 ,

There Be Dragons: A film that shows that forgiveness can change the future

from Diane Thunder Schlosser's entry on enerpub:

There Be Dragons is a powerful story of war, tragedy, love, forgiveness, and redemption. Set during the often overlooked horrors of the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s, it tells the story of two boyhood friends who enter the seminary, but when the war interrupts their lives, one leaves the seminary and chooses the life of a soldier though driven by jealousy and revenge. The other remains in the seminary and becomes a priest just when the provisional government of Spain is on the brink of murdering over 6,000 priests and religious.  Each will struggle to find the power of forgiveness over the forces that tear their lives --and their friendship --apart.

Apr 21, 2011 ,

"Forgive us our trespasses": The complexity of forgiveness

from the entry by Raul Brandeis Raushenbush on Huffington Post:

Forgiveness is such an obvious part of religious commitments and human sensibility that the conversation around giving and getting forgiveness is often mechanistic, sentimental or superficial. Fortunately, veteran filmmaker Helen Whitney is offering a rare chance to shine a clear light on the question of forgiveness in all its complexities, horror and hope in her two part series entitled: Forgiveness: A Time to Love and a Time to Hate to be shown on April 17th and 24th on PBS stations around the country.

....Whitney's film takes the viewer on a slow roller coaster of emotions. Instead of finding hundreds of talking heads and moving speedily from idea to idea, the documentary lingers on a relatively few cases; letting the viewer sift through the layers of complexity and raw drama. The shooting of the Amish School children, a victim of a brutal attack with an axe, the murder of a police officer by a 1960's revolutionary, a woman knowingly infected with AIDS -- different life situations that challenge the breezy rhetoric of 'forgive and forget' and move deeper into genuine wrestling with the emotional and spiritual demands inherent in forgiveness.

Apr 20, 2011 ,

Could you forgive this? Liz Securro's road to forgiveness

from the article by Heide Banks:

Liz Securro knows first-hand the consequences of self-judgment and the rewards of self-forgiveness. In her recent book, "Crash Into Me: A Survivor's Search for Justice," Liz shares her story that spanned 20-plus years and stemmed from a rape she endured in college. You do not have to relate to the magnitude of her circumstances to be able to learn from her journey of self-forgiveness.

....It wasn't until she started dealing with the much deeper issues that she was able to regain herself. At some point it stopped for her. She took the clothes she had, and she burned them in a cemetery. She was tired of being the victim. What she realized was that although something was done to her, what she did to herself was far worse. She was judging herself for her behaviors. Her life really took hold when she was able to forgive herself for all those things that she did, which none of us would have ever judged her for.

Apr 19, 2011 ,

We must not forgive too easily, says Archbishop of Canterbury

from Liz Thomas' article in Mail Online:

It may be a key Christian principle but forgiving too easily can be dangerous, the Archbishop of Canterbury has suggested.

Rowan Williams has warned that easy forgiveness can make suffering appear not to matter. 

In BBC1’s What is the Point in Forgiveness?, to be broadcast on Good Friday, the Archbishop also concedes that it is not fair to expect victims of abuse, rape or torture to turn the other cheek with ease.

Apr 18, 2011 ,

Church vandals apologise to congregation

from the article by Rene Gerryts on Bridport News:

Four of the youngsters responsible for vandalising a Bridport church stood before its congregation on Sunday to apologise.

The quartet – whose images were captured on CCTV – agreed to take part in the new Restorative Justice scheme.

....Mr Evans said: “It is the first time I have been involved in this sort of system and it was terrific.

Apr 15, 2011 , , , ,

The hardest kind of justice

from Bendert Katier's article on United Academics:

In countries throughout the world prisons are about to reach capacity, or more commonly, are completely overcrowded. Of those that do manage to get out of prison, in the case of the UK and the US for example, the rate of recidivism hovers around 50 and 60% every year since the mid-nineties. Meaning more than half of all former prisoners never get rehabilitated, never deal with issues of responsibility, trauma and emotion.

Furthermore, legal systems are flooded with cases creating a bottleneck that causes even the smallest of cases to last far longer than they should. When you add to this situation the astronomical costs of the average criminal justice system, it is easy to see that increasingly, governments have reached a breaking point. On the other side of the coin are the victims. Between the judges and the lawyers the average victim has a limited role in the very trial that is supposed to provide them with some sense of resolution and justice.The trauma that comes with the pain and suffering can last a lifetime.

Apr 11, 2011 , ,

Storytelling: Simple but profound

by Lynette Parker

I hesitate to write about storytelling and restorative justice as a lot of people have written about the profound impact of this form of communication. A quick search for the term “storytelling” on Restorative Justice Online returns 29 different entries by people such as Kris Miner and Kay Pranis. Yet, I’ve recently been reminded of how important storytelling can be not only in communication but for an individual processing through pain and loss. 

I remember talking with a woman who had lost her son in an automobile accident that involved drunk driving.  She expressed a series of emotions ranging from grief to anger to denial. In telling me about the impact of her son’s death, she also described her anger and frustration with the criminal justice system in that her family was denied an opportunity to tell their story.  She summed up all this in saying that they deserved the right to have the conference with the young man who had been driving that day. They deserved to be able to tell him how profoundly that one night had changed their lives. 

Apr 06, 2011 , , ,

'Why I confronted the man who raped me’

from David Barrett's article in The Sunday Telegraph:

Dr Claire Chung, who has agreed to waive her anonymity in The Sunday Telegraph, was raped twice in the stinking stairwell of a multi-storey car park, and the crime caused her life to collapse “like a pack of cards”.

Dr Chung, a highly regarded GP with more than 20 years’ medical experience, lost her job, her marriage and her home after being raped by Stephen Allen Gale, who had been released from prison for another sexual offence just one day earlier.

But following the attack, which she described in chilling detail, Dr Chung negotiated with the authorities to allow a meeting with Gale in prison.

The meeting was organised as part of a “restorative justice” scheme, which brings criminals face to face with their victims.

Mar 30, 2011 , , , , , ,

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