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Showing 10 posts filed under: Policy [–] [Show all]

Harper government misguided in its tough-on-crime approach

from the Globa and Mail editorial:

David Daubney, a justice-department adviser, could have gone quietly into retirement. Instead, he tried to talk some sense back into this country. Prison overcrowding will worsen and breed violence, he told The Globe's Kirk Makin in an exit interview. The tough-on-crime route has been tried and failed. The government knows what it knows, doesn't listen to evidence and is reluctant to ask for research to be undertaken.

“The policy is based on fear – fear of criminals and fear of people who are different. I do not think these harsh views are deeply held.” It's a good point. A new poll shows that 93 per cent of Canadians feel safe from crime. Why, then, spend billions of dollars to go backward?

Dec 29, 2011 , , , ,

Fearmonger and Through The Glass: Books that undermine Harper's omnibus crime bill

Shannon Moroney. Through The Glass. by Shannon Moroney. Toronto: Doubleday Canada, 2011. 368pp.
Paula Mallea. Fearmonger: Stephen Harper's Tough On Crime Agenda. Toronto: Lorimer. 2011, 232pp.

from the review by Matthew Behrens in rabble.ca:

It's a rare event in the Canadian publishing world when non-fiction books line up in sync with current events, but these two titles are perfectly timed as Canadians consider the serious consequences of the Harper government's dramatic omnibus crime bill, one that will radically alter an already deteriorating judicial system.

....Those who'd like an inkling of what could come down the pipe can do no better than read Paula Mallea's appropriately named Fearmonger, an outstanding overview of recently passed and proposed crime legislation.

Dec 28, 2011 , , , , ,

Celebrity chef backs new Scottish Police hate crime scheme

from the news release by Lothian and Borders Police:

Celebrity chef Tony Singh is backing Lothian and Borders Police pioneering new scheme for tackling Juvenile Hate Crime.

The Edinburgh based TV regular launched the scheme with Deputy Chief Constable Steve Allen, and LGBT Youth Scotland’s Schools Development Manager, Cara Spence, at LGBT Youth Scotland, Leith, on Monday 12th December.

Dec 26, 2011 , , ,

Restorative justice in a case of serious sexual assault

from the article by Claire Chung for Restorative Justice Week 2011:

....I was raped twice, at knifepoint, by a man who had been released from prison, just 24 hours earlier. I was his 27th victim. I reported the crime immediately. He had walked off abruptly in the middle of the attack and I was sure of 2 things: he had done this before and he would do it again.

I was believed and the rapist was caught, sentenced and returned to prison. Justice was done. Since the assailant pled “guilty” he was allowed a third off his tariff and the Judge, “to spare me any further distress”, proceeded quickly to his decision. Although I was in court, nobody looked at me and nobody heard me.

Dec 23, 2011 , , , , ,

Restorative justice: Making crooks say 'sorry' is a success

from the article by Stephan Briggs in the Evening Telegraph:

....Today, Cambridgeshire police Chief Constable Simon Parr said he was delighted with the project’s success.

He said: “Restorative Justice has been a real success across the whole of the county and especially in Peterborough.

“We have had no complaints from anyone about using this as a deterrent or punishment, as people can see a result straight away.

Dec 16, 2011 , , ,

Restorative hub-school model

from Restorative Approaches in Norfolk Schools:

Norfolk County Council Children’s Services are currently working on a restorative hub-school model with the aim that schools who are proficient and committed to using restorative approaches can provide support and guidance to other schools.

Dec 12, 2011 , ,

“Somebody could have died that day.”

from the article by Laura Mirsky in Restorative Practices Blog:

“Somebody could have died that day.” That’s what a student said after a fight nearly erupted at a small Detroit high school last month. But a restorative circle squashed the tension and prevented a tragedy.

Dec 09, 2011 , , ,

A review of the Youth Justice System in Northern Ireland

from the report by the Department of Justice Northern Ireland:

One of the most positive developments to have arisen out of Northern Ireland’s recent history is the expansion of rich and varied restorative practices. Restorative approaches have been used to respond to offending and anti-social behaviour, family disputes, disruptive behaviour in schools and children’s homes and in helping prisoners reintegrate back into their communities. Early teething problems have been largely overcome and professional practice in restorative justice in Northern Ireland is now internationally recognised.

Dec 01, 2011 , , , , , , ,

Standing Committee

from Wilma Derksen's entry on Bittersweet:

I am meeting with the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights this morning.

This is what I will be saying.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I am pleased to have this opportunity to address you and the rest of the committee regarding Bill C-10, The Safe Streets & Community Act.

....My daughter, Candace, was 13 years old when she was abducted and found murdered six weeks later. We lived without knowing the details of what happened for two decades.

Nov 23, 2011 , , , , , , , ,

Crime victims turning to restorative justice

from the article by Frazer Maude on Sky News:

...[F]or an increasing number of victims, restorative justice has helped them move on with their lives in a way they never thought possible.

Joanne Nodding is one such victim. She told Sky News how she feared for her life when she was raped almost 10 years ago, and how even seeing her attacker being sentenced to life did little to help her achieve closure.

Nov 17, 2011 , , , ,

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