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Showing 10 posts filed under: Policy [–] [Show all]

Campaign on way to counter cyberbullies

from Anthony Loncaric's article in Brimbank Weekly:

Parents living in the north-west are calling for more support to deal with cyberbullying as the state government prepares a new advertising campaign to encourage young people to speak up.

Education Minister Martin Dixon said the campaign would be similar to the hard-hitting advertisements aimed at reducing the road toll.

Mar 20, 2012 , , ,

Restorative Justice in the Greater Manchester Police

from the report by Baxter, Schoeman and Goffin called Innovation in justice: New delivery models and better outcomes:

....The first of the five aims, to reduce crime, is an area where GMP has had significant success in recent years. A key part of the crime reduction strategy is to “make more use of Restorative Justice to give victims the opportunity to challenge offenders and make them understand the consequences of their behaviour”. In a criminal Justice context, victims are given the chance to tell offenders the real impact of their crime, to get answers and to get an apology. This helps offenders understand the real impact of what they’ve done and holds them to account for it while also helping victims to get on with their lives.

To some extent, RJ runs counter to the culture that developed within police forces in response to central government targets because it can adversely affect the statistics traditionally used to assess police performance. Performance was measured against targets such as the numbers of sanctioned detections (where an offender is charged, cautioned, reported for summons, reprimanded, the offence is taken into consideration or where a fixed penalty notice is issued), the numbers of stop and search events and numbers of arrests. The last of these central government policing targets was removed in 2010.

Mar 09, 2012 , , , , , , , ,

Applying a restorative justice approach to student conduct

from the article by Daniel Fusch in Academic Impressions:

....Taking an RJ approach requires a philosophical shift for the student conduct office – it entails new sets of questions for student conduct hearings and an alert ear for cases in which there is the possibility to restore harm that’s been done, rather than simply (or only) penalize.

....To learn more about how to make a restorative justice program most successful, we interviewed two officials from Colorado State University, which has frequently been recognized for its restorative justice and other student conduct programs. The two officials are Paul Osincup and Melissa Emerson, the associate and assistant directors of conflict resolution and student conduct services at CSU. Paul Osincup holds student conduct hearings; Melissa Emerson manages the restorative justice process once a student has been referred as a likely RJ candidate.

Mar 06, 2012 , , ,

More action needed to bolster good behavior

from the article by Alan J. Borsuk in the Journel Sentinel:

I don't know exactly what happened during a funeral at a church at N. 53rd and W. Burleigh streets last Tuesday, but I know it was bad.

I know a lot more about what happened in the library at Bradley Tech High School the next morning, and I know it was good.

Mar 01, 2012 , , , ,

Leicestershire Pc Sandie to give US cops policing lesson

from the article in This Is Leicestershire:

New York State's police are to get a lesson in policing from a county copper.

Pc Sandie Hastings will be heading across the Atlantic for a two-week stint with a US police department to teach its officers about restorative justice.

The 58-year-old has been responsible for training her Leicestershire colleagues – and thousands from other British forces – in the concept, in which offenders are made to put right the consequences of their crimes rather than face court action.

She will explain the idea to the officers of Rochester Police Department, who patrol the city with the highest per capita homicide rate in New York State.

Feb 23, 2012 , , , , , ,

UC explores restorative justice in improving campus climate

from Harry Mok's article in UC Newsroom:

A residence hall fire alarm is pulled as a drunken prank in the middle of the night. A fellow resident, who happens to be gay, witnesses it and confronts the culprit as the building is evacuated. In the exchange of words, the prankster utters a pejorative term for a homosexual man in a profanity-laced tirade.

Fortunately, the situation was just part of a role-playing exercise. Twenty-three student affairs staff members, from all 10 University of California campuses, took part in training for restorative justice, a conflict resolution process that UC is considering for use when dealing with incidents of intolerance or hate, particularly for conduct that, while offensive, may not violate any laws or policies.

Feb 20, 2012 , , ,

Let’s make restorative justice a reality in 2012

from the article by Robert Buckland MP in TRG Egremont:

Having worked for many years in the criminal justice system, prosecuting and defending in criminal cases, I am acutely aware that the trial process does not - and cannot - address the problems faced by victims of crime.

Since my election to Parliament in 2010, I have taken an increasing interest in restorative justice and how it can play a bigger role in the criminal justice system in the UK. Restorative justice can help turn lives around for the offenders and aid the healing process among victims of crime.

Feb 15, 2012 , , , ,

Restorative justice: The new way forward

from Lisa Rea's article in Baylor University's Christian Refelction issue on Prison:

.... Some might argue that our prison system was never meant to positively affect victims and communities. I will not analyze the original purpose of prisons in society, but we know that prisons have become something far different than what they were intended to be. Most societies have incarcerated individuals who were deemed to be a violent threat to others, but the United States prison system today has grown immensely beyond this rationale. As a result, the American state and federal prison population has expanded dramatically. 

Feb 07, 2012 , , , ,

Martin Luther King and life after hate

from the entry by Evelyn Zellerer on Peace of the Circle:

....“The nonviolent approach does not immediately change the heart of the oppressor. It first does something to the hearts and souls of those committed to it. It gives them new self-respect; it calls up resources of strength and courage that they did not know they had. Finally it reaches the opponent and so stirs his conscience that reconciliation becomes a reality.” [Martin Luther King]

Feb 02, 2012 , , ,

Review: A community-based approach to the reduction of sexual re-offending: circles of support and accountability

A community-based approach to the reduction of sexual re-offending: circles of support and accountability. Stephen Hanvey, Terry Philpot and Chris Wilson. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2011. 192 pp. £19.99. ISBN 978-1-84905-198-9 (pbk) 

by Martin Wright

Often sex offenders are isolated people who have difficulty making relationships, and when they come out of prison the double stigma of prison and the nature of their offence isolates them still more – an extra hardship for them, and an increased risk that they will revert to their previous behaviour. So the idea of forming a circle of support for them is both humane and a safeguard. It does not fall under the usual definition of restorative justice, because it does not include dialogue with the victim, which would in many cases be unwanted and/or inappropriate. It does however restore or even improve the situation of the offender, and it involves members of the community. 

Feb 01, 2012 , , , , , , , ,

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