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Showing 10 posts filed under: Policy [–] [Show all]

Celebrity chef backs new Scottish Police hate crime scheme

from the news release by Lothian and Borders Police:

Celebrity chef Tony Singh is backing Lothian and Borders Police pioneering new scheme for tackling Juvenile Hate Crime.

The Edinburgh based TV regular launched the scheme with Deputy Chief Constable Steve Allen, and LGBT Youth Scotland’s Schools Development Manager, Cara Spence, at LGBT Youth Scotland, Leith, on Monday 12th December.

Dec 26, 2011 , , ,

Restorative justice in a case of serious sexual assault

from the article by Claire Chung for Restorative Justice Week 2011:

....I was raped twice, at knifepoint, by a man who had been released from prison, just 24 hours earlier. I was his 27th victim. I reported the crime immediately. He had walked off abruptly in the middle of the attack and I was sure of 2 things: he had done this before and he would do it again.

I was believed and the rapist was caught, sentenced and returned to prison. Justice was done. Since the assailant pled “guilty” he was allowed a third off his tariff and the Judge, “to spare me any further distress”, proceeded quickly to his decision. Although I was in court, nobody looked at me and nobody heard me.

Dec 23, 2011 , , , , ,

Restorative justice: Making crooks say 'sorry' is a success

from the article by Stephan Briggs in the Evening Telegraph:

....Today, Cambridgeshire police Chief Constable Simon Parr said he was delighted with the project’s success.

He said: “Restorative Justice has been a real success across the whole of the county and especially in Peterborough.

“We have had no complaints from anyone about using this as a deterrent or punishment, as people can see a result straight away.

Dec 16, 2011 , , ,

Restorative hub-school model

from Restorative Approaches in Norfolk Schools:

Norfolk County Council Children’s Services are currently working on a restorative hub-school model with the aim that schools who are proficient and committed to using restorative approaches can provide support and guidance to other schools.

Dec 12, 2011 , ,

“Somebody could have died that day.”

from the article by Laura Mirsky in Restorative Practices Blog:

“Somebody could have died that day.” That’s what a student said after a fight nearly erupted at a small Detroit high school last month. But a restorative circle squashed the tension and prevented a tragedy.

Dec 09, 2011 , , ,

A review of the Youth Justice System in Northern Ireland

from the report by the Department of Justice Northern Ireland:

One of the most positive developments to have arisen out of Northern Ireland’s recent history is the expansion of rich and varied restorative practices. Restorative approaches have been used to respond to offending and anti-social behaviour, family disputes, disruptive behaviour in schools and children’s homes and in helping prisoners reintegrate back into their communities. Early teething problems have been largely overcome and professional practice in restorative justice in Northern Ireland is now internationally recognised.

Dec 01, 2011 , , , , , , ,

Standing Committee

from Wilma Derksen's entry on Bittersweet:

I am meeting with the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights this morning.

This is what I will be saying.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I am pleased to have this opportunity to address you and the rest of the committee regarding Bill C-10, The Safe Streets & Community Act.

....My daughter, Candace, was 13 years old when she was abducted and found murdered six weeks later. We lived without knowing the details of what happened for two decades.

Nov 23, 2011 , , , , , , , ,

Crime victims turning to restorative justice

from the article by Frazer Maude on Sky News:

...[F]or an increasing number of victims, restorative justice has helped them move on with their lives in a way they never thought possible.

Joanne Nodding is one such victim. She told Sky News how she feared for her life when she was raped almost 10 years ago, and how even seeing her attacker being sentenced to life did little to help her achieve closure.

Nov 17, 2011 , , , ,

Review: Walking the talk: Developing ethics frameworks for the practice of restorative justice

Walking the talk: Developing ethics frameworks for the practice of restorative justice. Susan Sharpe. Langley, BC, Canada: Community Justice Initiatives Association. 2011. 62 pages.

by Lynette Parker

While restorative justice is a theory that encompasses a set of values for how justice should be done, maintaining those values and the restorative focus can become difficult in day-to-day practice. People working in restorative justice organisations – whether staff or volunteers – make a myriad of decisions related to practices each day. Such decisions may be related to work with clients, work with other organisations or internal processes and interactions. How can they make these decisions while maintaining the integrity of their restorative justice programme?

Susan Sharpe seeks to answer this question with Walking the talk: Developing ethics frameworks for the practice of restorative justice. In the 62 page publication, Sharpe sets out a process that organisations and individual practitioners can use to develop an ethics framework to empower and guide decisionmaking. In doing so, she avoids the contentious issue of setting standards by developing the steps in a process that each organisation can use to develop a framework that has direct meaning for it and the various issues that it faces.

Nov 09, 2011 , , , , , , ,

Can restorative justice help balance the scales for African-American youth?

from the article by Rebecca M. Stone in the Miami Herald:

Darryl is a 12-year-old African American boy whose mother, Ariel, is a single parent. Ariel left high school after becoming pregnant with Darryl and has struggled to find anything but minimum wage jobs to support her family.

One day when he was out with another friend, Darryl and his friend snuck into the neighbor's house and stole a video game. The neighbors called the police.

One might conclude that the future does not bode well for Darryl. In fact, we probably would not be surprised if we were to learn later on that he was in prison. However, there is much more to his story, and much to learn from it. The police response ultimately resulted in a restorative intervention and provided Darryl with an alternative approach.

Nov 04, 2011 , , , ,

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