Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

RSS
Filter
Showing 10 posts filed under: Country:New Zealand [–] [Show all]

Select committee urged to avoid courtroom 'Oprahfication'

from the article on Voxy.co.nz:

Rethinking Crime and Punishment agrees that victims should be able to provide information to the court about the effects of offending; and the harm they have suffered. However, it does not believe that the presentation of a victim impact statement in the Court, was the best way to achieve it.

Apr 24, 2012 , , , , , ,

Stalking accused trying to abuse system

from Ian Steward's article on Stuff.co.nz:

A man described by police as "New Zealand's most dangerous stalker" has requested a restorative justice session with his latest alleged victim, though a judge has rejected it as a transparent attempt to "keep in touch".

Jan 25, 2012 , , ,

Twenty years of restorative justice in New Zealand

from the article by Fred W.M. McElrea in Tikkun:

As I look back over the last twenty years, the following aspects of the family group conference system stand out as being both innovative and of potential value to adult systems as well:

Jan 23, 2012 , , , , , ,

Badlands or fairyland? How to misuse statistics and confuse the public

from Rethining Crime and Punishment's new newsletter Truth in Justice:

If Truth in Justice were to have an annual award in 12 months time for the most inaccurate, misleading and appalling publication on crime and punishment, it is unlikely that anything would surpass Badlands: NZ - A Land Fit for Criminals by David Fraser and published by Ian Wishart.

While we were reluctant to give it any more publicity, the book is a self-contained case study of what can happen when someone with a set ideological agenda sets out to prove their position through false logic and the misuse of statistics. It almost qualifies as a serious hazard to public safety.

We asked three people to review the book. Each has approached it from a different perspective.

Aug 03, 2011 , , , , ,

Doing justice honourably

from Janet Sim Elder's post on Per Crucem ad Lucem:

A crucial question in this election year is how do we do justice honourably with both victims and offenders? How can recidivism continue downwards and how do public attitudes change to being solidly evidence-based? How do we face the challenge of changing the justice landscape? Can we provide the moral courage to help our society take steps towards a more just and merciful society?

Jul 19, 2011 , , , ,

New Zealand: Rethinking contributes to Circles of Support and Accountability

from the newsletter of Rethinking Crime and Punishment:

Developed by a Mennonite community in Canada in the 1990's, COSA are groups of volunteers from the community into which the offender is released. They meet with a sex offender regularly, provide support for their reintegration and at the same time, hold them accountable for their actions. The volunteers receive extensive training and are fully informed of the offender's history, patterns of offending and the thoughts and behaviours that are likely to signal regression. The Circles begin working with the offender before they are released and are headed by a Circle Coordinator who is connected to other relevant agencies and professionals (e.g. probations, the police and clinicians) calling upon their support and advice as required.

Jul 14, 2011 , , ,

Victim impact statements: Some concerns about current practice and proposed changes

from the article by Chris Marshall in Rethinking Crime and Punishment:

Currently victims have the right to submit a VIS in a variety of ways, though it is usually in writing, and to request the opportunity to present the statement in open court. The judge has the discretion to deny this request and to edit the statement if there are concerns about its length or content. Under the new proposal, victims will have the right to use their own words in the VIS and “to address the offender so that the offender may better perceive the impact of the offence on the victim”. For serious offences (s.29 of the Victims Rights Act), victims will have an automatic right to present their VIS in court, though the judge retains the right to manage the process.

Jun 28, 2011 , , , ,

Twenty years of restorative justice in New Zealand: Reflections of a judicial participant

from the article by Judge Fred McElrea:

The following aspects of the family group conference system stand out after 20 years as being both innovative and of potential value to adult systems as well:

Jun 24, 2011 , , , , , ,

New Zealand study: Reoffending Analysis for Restorative Justice Cases: 2008 and 2009

from the Ministry of Justice study and summary:

The aim of this study was to determine whether restorative justice conferences led to reduced reoffending. It is based on data for offenders completing conferences in 2008 and 2009 compared with a similar group of offenders who did not receive restorative justice.

The principal finding of the report is that restorative justice had a statistically significant impact on reducing the proportion of people reoffending, and for those who did reoffend, there is an indication of a reduction in the frequency of reoffending and a lower rate of imprisonment.

Jun 16, 2011 , , ,

New Zealand: Church leaders call for review of criminal justice system

From the article by the Episcopal News Service:

Anglican church leaders in New Zealand are urging politicians to set up a special commission to investigate the country's criminal justice system.

The move follows a remark by the Deputy Prime Minister Bill English that "prisons are a fiscal and moral failure."

Archbishops David Moxon and Brown Turei – along with the Anglican Social Justice Commissioner, the Rev. Anthony Dancer – fully agree with English's view.

They suggest politicians can build on English's remarks by: setting up a criminal justice commission to provide independent advice to the government; taking a non-political, bi-partisan approach to those issues; and systematically investigating alternatives to jail, such as restorative justice.

Jun 02, 2011 ,

RSS
RJOB Archive
View all

About RJOB

Donate

 

Correspondents

Eric Assur portlet image

 

LN-blue
 

 lp-blue

 

lr

 

dv-blue

 

kw-blue

 

mw-blue