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Showing 10 posts filed under: Region: North America and Caribbean [–] [Show all]

Soliciting community involvement and support for restorative justice through community service

from the article by William R. Wood in Criminal Justice Policy Review:

In 2001, the Clark County Juvenile Court (CCJC) in Washington State adopted what it calls “restorative community service” (RCS). Prior to 2001, youth sentenced to community service had been assigned by to work crews to pick up trash, wash county vehicles and so on. Under RCS, however, the court switched its use of community service from work crews to nonprofit and public organizations, where youth generally worked alongside community volunteers.

Oct 02, 2013 , , ,

NIH to fund first randomized controlled trials for restorative practices in 16 Maine schools

from the article on Restorative Works:

RAND Corporation, in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health, is embarking on a randomized controlled study to measure the effectiveness of restorative practices in influencing school environments and decreasing problem behaviors.

Oct 01, 2013 , , , ,

Program enables Pa. inmate to apologize to victims

from article on MySA:

A program that enables Pennsylvania inmates to apologize in writing to victims of their crimes has more letters than people signed up to receive them.

State officials hope to change that by publicizing the Inmate Apology Bank, an initiative of the Department of Corrections and the Office of Victim Advocate.

"It really benefits both victims and offenders," said Carol Lavery, who has headed the state victim advocacy office for seven years. "Without this program, there is no way an apology could be made. It is a violation for an offender to send an apology letter directly to a victim. That is not allowed, even when one is wanted."

Sep 11, 2013 , , ,

Six boys, one cop, and the road to restorative justice

from the article by Molly Rowan Leach:

It’s a warm summer night in Longmont, Colorado, a vibrant midsized city in the Rocky Mountains.  On a dare, six young men aged between ten and thirteen years plan to break into a giant chemical processing plant. High levels of alcohol and testosterone, peer pressure and a moonless night propel the group towards the locked gates of the factory, and they break in.

Across town at the Police Department, Officer Greg Ruprecht is about to embark on night patrol.  A former Army Captain and top of his class at the Police Academy, Ruprecht believes his job is to arrest everyone who commits a crime and throw away the key. Justice means punishment: an eye for an eye, no questions asked. You do something bad and you get what you deserve. There’s a clear line to walk. But what occurred at the chemical plant that night changed him forever by awakening a very different sensibility: instead of an instrument of vengeance, justice requires that we work to restore all those who have been injured by a crime.

Aug 30, 2013 , , , , , ,

Approaching juvenile crime head on

From the article by Leila day

When people get into trouble with the law, they normally don’t have a chance to have a conversation with their victims. To explain what happened. Hear about the damage they caused. Say they’re sorry. But there’s a growing trend to try and make that happen, so both parties can move on.

Restorative Justice brings together the accused, the victim, supportive parties, and authorities. All at the same table in a safe space. It’s an old idea and it’s international. In fact, in New Zealand, where it was originally used by indigenous Maoris, it's a mandatory part of the criminal justice system. Here, in the U.S, these community conferences are increasingly being used in prisons, schools and as an alternative to juvenile detention.

Aug 28, 2013 , , , , ,

Restorative justice is on the rise

From the article by Molly Rowan Leach at Huff Post Crime:

Restorative Justice is on the rise exponentially in the United States. As millions continue to experience and witness a collective 'justice' that is tainted by racial discrimination, by billions in profit, by the warehousing of our meek, a school-to-prison pipeline and by the practices of expecting punishment and isolation for all involved when crime occurs to actually function as rehabilitative, there is a form in the air, in the political, in the grassroots, in the hearts of the people, that offers a viable life-ring out of this deluge.

Jul 30, 2013 , ,

A Philadelphia School's Big Bet on Nonviolence

from the article by Jeff Deeney in The Atlantic: 

Last year when American Paradigm Schools took over Philadelphia's infamous, failing John Paul Jones Middle School, they did something a lot of people would find inconceivable. The school was known as "Jones Jail" for its reputation of violence and disorder, and because the building physically resembled a youth correctional facility. Situated in the Kensington section of the city, it drew students from the heart of a desperately poor hub of injection drug users and street level prostitution where gun violence rates are off the charts. But rather than beef up the already heavy security to ensure safety and restore order, American Paradigm stripped it away. During renovations, they removed the metal detectors and barred windows.

The police predicted chaos. But instead, new numbers seem to show that in a single year, the number of serious incidents fell by 90%.

Jul 22, 2013 , , ,

Vision 21: Transforming victim services. Final report

from the report released by the Office for Victims of Crime:

...The discussions that formed the basis for Vision 21 demonstrated that only a truly comprehensive and far-reaching approach would achieve the vast changes needed to move the field forward. Stakeholders saw that a holistic approach to victims’ needs is essential but will require unprecedented collaboration among service providers, an ongoing challenge for the field.

Jul 16, 2013 , , , ,

Restorative Justice in Belfast — a different way to right wrongs

From the article by Abigail Curtis in Bangor Daily News:

The dimly lit gathering space of the Unitarian Universalist Church made a cool setting last month for an event that promised to get a little hot under the collar.

The incidents that led up to the circle of earnest people wrestling with ideas of justice and punishment at the church began last August, when three young men from Belfast got drunk and engaged in a destructive, late-night vandalism spree. They broke windows at MacLeod Furniture, the Belfast Dance Studio and the city park snack stand, and left broken glass in City Park Pool.

Jul 12, 2013 , , ,

Victim makes teen car prowlers face up to crime spree

from the article by  Christine Clarridge in The Seattle Times:

When Eliza Webb found a stranger’s cellphone inside her ransacked car last month, it didn’t take a lot of sleuthing to determine two things: one, the cellphone probably belonged to the person who’d prowled her car; and two, the culprit was likely a teen.

Webb, who works with high-school students and is married to a man who has paid dearly for a youthful indiscretion, paused before summoning police.

“I think bringing the police and courts into something like this can have long-term, devastating consequences for kids,” said Webb, 29, of West Seattle.

Jul 09, 2013 , , , ,

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