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Showing 10 posts filed under: Prison [–] [Show all]

The limits of empathy

from David Brooks' column in the New York Times:

....Empathy orients you toward moral action, but it doesn’t seem to help much when that action comes at a personal cost. You may feel a pang for the homeless guy on the other side of the street, but the odds are that you are not going to cross the street to give him a dollar.

There have been piles of studies investigating the link between empathy and moral action. Different scholars come to different conclusions, but, in a recent paper, Jesse Prinz, a philosopher at City University of New York, summarized the research this way: “These studies suggest that empathy is not a major player when it comes to moral motivation. Its contribution is negligible in children, modest in adults, and nonexistent when costs are significant.” Other scholars have called empathy a “fragile flower,” easily crushed by self-concern.

Oct 04, 2011 , ,

The curious Mr Howard: Legendary prison reformer

The curious Mr Howard: Legendary prison reformer. Tessa West. Hook: Waterside Press, 2011. 377 pp.

reviewed by Martin Wright

Many adjectives could be applied to John Howard: methodical, persistent, even obsessive. 'Curious' in the title of this new biography is apt, meaning both 'unusual' and 'wanting to find out'. Tessa West has made full use of published and archival sources, some of them not available to previous biographers, to present an insightful and readable account of 'the Philanthropist', as he was known.

Sep 22, 2011 , ,

Restorative justice and prisoner reintegration

from Joe Casey and Ben Jarman's report The Social Reintegration of Ex-Prisoners in Council of Europe Member States:

The offender had already been in prison for five years. He had been convicted of rape. He and the victim had known each other; they had grown up in the same neighbourhood, he had been friends with the victim’s brother, and the victim’s father had been his teacher at primary school. The case, with his agreement, was referred to mediators by the director of his prison rehabilitation programme. He felt ashamed, and  felt he needed the victim to hear him admit the crime, since at trial he had denied his role in the crime, under the guidance of his lawyer, and had in fact blamed the offence on the victim.

Sep 19, 2011 , , , ,

Murderers turned peacemakers

from the article by Laurel Kaufer on Peace X Peace:

How is it that women, with dark pasts, serving time for murder and manslaughter, could possibly become honored peacemakers?

Their story is one of personal commitment to themselves and the community in which most are destined to live out their lives. “This is an environment filled with conflict and violence. There is a dire need and want for change,” says Susan Russo, one of the fifteen initial peacemakers, serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole at the largest prison for women in the world, Valley State Prison for Women in Chowchilla, CA. “Mediation interests all of us because we are lifers and long-termers hoping to make a difference in teaching our peers that there is a better way.”

Beginning her quest in 2007, Sue Russo wrote over 50 handwritten letters from prison to mediators all over California. Her letters went unanswered until August of 2009 when one of her letters made it to me, Laurel Kaufer, Esq., a Southern California mediator and peacemaker and founder of the post-Katrina Mississippi Mediation Project.

Sep 06, 2011 , , , , , , ,

After the crime: the power of restorative justice. Dialogues between victims and violent offenders

by Martin Wright

After the Crime: The power of restorative justice:  Dialogues between victims and violent offenders. Susan L. Miller.  New York and London:  New York University Press, 2011.  265 pp.

Violence, rape, murder and other abusive crimes:  not usually pleasant subjects to read about, yet Susan Miller's book left this reader with a positive feeling.  This is largely due to Miller herself, who presents the information in a straightforward, sympathetic but non-judgemental way;  to Kim Book, who started the organization Victims' Voices Heard after her daughter was murdered; and to the participants themselves.  Not all victims felt able to forgive, and this should not be a criterion for 'success';   but they followed the Amish precept:  don't balance hurt with hate.  Not all offenders accepted full responsibility.  Miller divides restorative justice into diversion, taking the place of the criminal justice process for relatively minor cases, and 'therapeutic' RJ, where the offender is already in custody or has served a prison term.  These cases are all in the latter category.

Jul 29, 2011 , , , , , , , , ,

Giving back: RCI’s Restorative Justice Program helps inmates help others

from Christine Won's article in the Journal Times:

On a recent Friday morning, 13 inmates at the Racine Correctional Institution in Sturtevant diligently worked on their needlework, their nimble fingers pulling together tiny stitches or weaves. The fruits of their toil lay strewn about the tables: a Mickey Mouse look-alike, a doll, random bears and other stuffed animals, as well as scarves, hats and more slowly took shape.

Those bears and lamb pillows have made their way into little hands around the community, and those mittens and gloves will keep others warm this winter.

Charity Crafts is part of the prison’s Restorative Justice Program, through which inmates find ways to give back to the community, according to Tommie Thomas, RCI program supervisor.

Jul 28, 2011 , , ,

Colorado mother wishes for meeting with son's killers

from Ivan Moreno's article in the San Francisco Chronicle:

The 3-year-old boy affectionately known as "Biscuit" was sleeping in the back of a parked old Cadillac when the shooting began.

Fourteen bullets hit the car in the drive-by shooting outside a northeast Denver duplex. Biscuit was shot in the head and died. His brother, Calvin, four days shy of his 7th birthday, and a teenage cousin were unhurt.

Sharletta Evans — mother of Biscuit, or Casson Xavier Evans — came to forgive the gunmen, who were 15 and 16 years old at the time of the Dec. 21, 1995, shooting. But it took years for her to decide she wanted to meet them in prison, hoping for closure.

A new Colorado law encourages the state Department of Corrections to facilitate such reconciliation meetings. Yet it's a process that requires they be safe and don't backfire on victims. And prison officials say there's simply no money to make it happen in the near future.

Jul 21, 2011 , , , , , ,

Restorative justice prison ministry manual available

from the article by Chris Meehan at crnca.org:

...."Restorative justice provides another way," said Lamsma. "Where retributive justice is concerned with violation against the state, restorative justice is first and foremost concerned with the person or people who were harmed in a crime . . . Restorative justice aims for healing of victims, for communities affected, and even for offenders, in the hopes that a cycle of destructive behavior will be broken."

Jun 06, 2011 , ,

Helping the community, building connections

by Lynette Parker

Recently, we shared the article “Give prisoners the chance to help the community” by Erwin James in which he describes prison as consisting of “enforced idleness” and working to “create model prisoners instead of model citizens.” Erwin describes the benefits of programmes allowing prisoners to do something for the community. Referring to his own participation in a Braille unit when incarcerated for murder, he says, “...it was the first time in our lives that we had experienced the satisfaction that can be gained from helping other people.”

I thought about Erwin’s article as I read about prisoners making trauma bears in the Australian state of Victoria. The programme – a partnership between Prison Fellowship Australia and the prisons – teaches prisoners how to sew and stuff the soft toys that are used by emergency service personnel to comfort children in trauma situations. The prisoners may also pay for the materials to make a soft toy for a loved one. Programme volunteers describe the paradox of watching the men who have caused harm work to create the soft toys. As described in the article, “Masculine hands clenched tight ready to harm or reaching out to thieve and finally bound for prison now develop something creative and productive that brings joy to traumatised children and their loved ones.”

May 27, 2011 , , , , ,

A scary, but exciting prospect

by Lynette Parker

Recently, I was in the Bahamas to conduct a training seminar on the Sycamore Tree Project® for Prison Fellowship Bahamas. A diverse group of people including prison officers, volunteers, and police officers gathered to learn about this in-prison restorative justice programme. Through the day and half of training two emotions stood out: fear and excitement. 

For many, especially the prison officers, the idea of bringing victims into prison to meet face-to-face with prisoners (but not their own offenders) was novel and a bit overwhelming. Although the programme has a positive track record in close to twenty countries, the training participants still had serious concerns about how this would work. For one thing, how do you handle victim anger? Why would victims want to go into prison? Isn’t this just setting up an explosive situation?

May 24, 2011 , , ,

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