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Showing 10 posts filed under: Practice [–] [Show all]

Not adding up: Criminal reconciliation in Chinese juvenile justice

from the article in Dui Hua's Human Rights Journal:

Recent amendments to China’s Criminal Procedure Law involve special procedures for handling cases involving juvenile defendants and resolving cases through criminal reconciliation. Although the law does not explicitly link the two, criminal reconciliation has been a key feature in the development of China’s juvenile justice system under the principle of “education first, punishment second.”

Dui Hua welcomes criminal reconciliation as a means to restorative justice and reduced juvenile incarceration, but research suggests that the relatively new measure is experiencing some growing pains in China. Jiang Jue (姜珏), a PhD candidate in the School of Law at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, has done extensive research on criminal reconciliation in China and has seen how the process works in many juvenile cases. Her research indicates that current implementation of criminal reconciliation falls short of juvenile justice principles by alienating youth and stifling attempts at education.

Jun 20, 2012 , , , , , ,

I want justice for conflict victims in Kenya

from the article by Tecla Namachnija in Eve Woman Magazine:

My experiences with people who had suffered as a result of conflict motivated me to go for the TJRC job. The conditions they faced were so harsh that I suffered secondary trauma at some point because I internalised the pain and suffering of the internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees I interacted with.

Having trained in restorative justice in the US and through my experience at the community level, I realised that the line between the victim and perpetrator is so blurred that only restorative justice could work.

Jun 15, 2012 , , , , ,

New Staffordshire crime-fighting partnership praised by Justice Secretary

from the article by Sonya Britton iin This Is Staffordshire

On a visit to Staffordshire's new integrated crime-fighting hub, Justice Secretary Lord McNally met former offenders, victims of crime, and staff from police, probation and drug treatment agencies.

And Lord McNally was impressed at the joint working shown by the 180° Integrated Offender Management partnership, which aims to help tackle the most challenging and prolific offenders in Staffordshire in an integrated way.

Jun 08, 2012 , , , , , , ,

Effective, even alone: Co-keep a restorative justice circle

from the post by Kirs Miner in Restorative Justice and Circles:

....Even if you are the only one assigned to be ‘keeping’ the Circle, know that your Circle will be more effective, if you view every person in the Circle as your co-keeper. I say things like “everyone is both teacher and student”. We honor the equal worth of every person, by having that respect and showing it to each person. That plays out into Circles where each person feels and experiences personal growth.

May 30, 2012 ,

Parole, release and restorative justice: Minister and National Council for Correctional Services

from the Summary of the Parliamentary Monitoring Group meeting:

The meeting provided an opportunity for the Portfolio Committee (PC) to engage with the Minister and the National Council for Correctional Services (NCCS) on matters of parole and release, with particular emphasis on the position of those sentenced to life imprisonment (lifers) and the role of the restorative justice processes. 

May 25, 2012 , , , , ,

Restorative justice circles: Meeting the social brain needs, developing humanity

from Kris Miner's entry on Restorative Justice and Circles:

A power point from the National Association of Social Workers was recently forwarded to me.  A great presentation I didn’t hear directly, by Johnathan Jordan, mindfully change.  Some pieces immediately resonated and I can see how Restorative Justice Circle process promotes and leverages brain based change!

May 08, 2012 , ,

There’s hope even for sex offenders

from Chris Dornin's article in Corrections.com:

....So we register sex offenders as surrogate terrorists and post their personal information as if it were bin Laden’s bio on the Internet for everyone to see. Failure to report to police on a quarterly basis earns a sex offender a new felony charge. We ban them from living near schools, daycare centers and school bus stops with draconian penalties for violations. We civilly commit them when they finish their prison terms. 

We make sure those are long sentences by stacking charges in multiple consecutive bids. Each image of child on hard drive becomes a separate felony. We give sex offenders special license plates. The police notify the neighbors when a sex offender moves in nearby. The neighbors evict them, or force the landlords to do it for them, sometimes subtly, sometimes with raw violence. 

Apr 25, 2012 , , ,

Circles for sex offenders first in the South

from the article by Dawn Baumgartner Vaughan in the Herald-Sun:

Durham is starting the first Circles of Safety and Accountability in the South for sex offenders getting out of prison. COSA will match recently released sex offenders in Durham with a circle of people who will meet with them weekly to hold them accountable and support them in re-entering the community.

Durham County is home to about 300 convicted sex offenders.

Apr 12, 2012 , , , , , ,

What's wrong with this picture: Thief stole laptop after apologising to victim

from the article in The Telepgraph:

Editor's Note: Alright, boys and girls. What mistakes were made in this case?

A thief forced to apologise to his victim for stealing his laptop under a restorative justice programme stole the man's replacement computer during the visit.

Months earlier Ivan Barker, 21, had stolen a laptop and cigarettes from wheelchair-bound Jean Jacque Mathely.

Apr 11, 2012 , , , ,

The Howard League as victim of crime

from the entry by Frances Crook (CEO of the Howard League) on her blog:

The Howard League is a victim of crime. Our credit card was used to pay for stuff for someone who clearly had got hold of the details fraudulently. We think what happened was that when we had a supplier in to do some work on the building (I am not being too specific here for obvious reasons, but telling the story as a warning to others) they phoned through the details to an associate. The details were used several times and we would have picked it up at the end of the month, but the fraudster got over-confident and used it for a sum of over £1,000 and the bank noticed and put a stop to it. We are going to be reimbursed so the charity will not be out of pocket.

Mar 23, 2012 , , , ,

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