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Showing 10 posts filed under: Practice [–] [Show all]

House passes revamped Juvenile Court Law

from the article by Ezra Sihite in the Jakarta Globe:

....Azis Syamsuddin, deputy chairman of House Commission III on legal affairs, said legislators were very thorough and careful in their deliberations on the legislation because the principle of restorative justice that it prioritized over punitive justice was unprecedented in Indonesia’s legal system.

In addition to promoting restorative justice, in which the needs of the perpetrator, victim and the victim’s family must be considered in reaching a solution that is aimed at healing rather than punishing, the new law also raises the minimum age at which juvenile offenders may be incarcerated to 14 years old.

The previous law set the limit at 12 years old.

Aug 02, 2012 , , ,

East Lancs probation officer shortlisted for national award

from the article in the Lancashire Telegraph:

A probation officer who helped the father of a peacemaker killed with a single punch meet his killer has been shortlisted for a national award.

Geraldine Martin was a finalist in the national Probation Award’s Victim Services category for her work with the family of Padiham Ladies' football coach, Adam Rogers from Blackburn.

Jul 26, 2012 , , , ,

Bullying not just a school issue

from the article by Joyanna Weber in the Cleveland Daily Banner:

For first time offenders, the juvenile court can try to mediate a resolution without the issue going to a courtroom. This is accomplished through mediation, informal adjustments and restorative justice. 

Restorative justice gets the victim and the accused and their parents in a room to discuss the issue before it can make its way to court.

Jul 25, 2012 , , ,

Five act lesson cycle: Humor in the classroom

from the article by R. Casey Davis on the Ecology of Education blog:

The Bard’s plays usually end in one of two ways depending upon their particular genre of theater. In essence, disharmony is created in the audience through the characters and their actions. Through the course of the dramatic arc, resolution is achieved by the fifth and final act. Shakespeare’s two forms of resolution are based upon whether the nature of the play is tragic or comedic. For tragic works, the resolution is retributive justice. Wrongs have been avenged. Conversely, for comedic works, the resolution is restorative justice. The imbalance in the plot is corrected and the situation is set aright.

Jul 13, 2012 , , , ,

Restorative justice at OWS

from the post by Stephan Geras on ZNet:

....However these “deeply personalized” new democratic processes will of necessity encounter obstacles and trip blocks which can bring to the surface individual and collective hurt or trauma; or in other words conflict which can obviously be strong enough to provoke violence. What’s referred to as the “cycle of violence” I interpret to mean that violence of any kind is internalized, whether it’s one on one or it’s a result of systemic mechanisms of oppression. 

Jul 12, 2012 , , , , ,

Voluntary participation in restorative practices

From the Restorative Justice Facilitator Code of Conduct and Standards of Training and Practice adopted by the Colorado Restorative Justice Council, April 2012:

A restorative justice facilitator shall conduct a restorative justice practice based on the principle of voluntary participation for all participants. Voluntary participation means that the participants in the restorative justice process have come to the meeting by choice. 

Jul 10, 2012 , , , ,

Community Justice Initiatives helps prevent and deal with elder abuse as Canada’s population ages

from the article in the Midland Daily News:

....Community Justice Initiatives' Elder Mediation Service (EMS) of Canada helps families and organizations, like nursing and retirement homes, deal with conflict and abuse involving seniors. The service restores safety when abuse has occurred and assists with the implementation of practices that prevent abuse.

....Elder abuse is the mistreatment of an older adult by someone that they should be able to rely on; a caregiver, a spouse, a child, another family member, or even a friend. It can include physical violence, psychological harm, financial abuse, or neglect. Abuse is a misuse of power in an attempt to control the behaviour of another person.

Jul 06, 2012 , ,

Police hunt church arsonists, aged just six and nine

from the article by Tammy Hughes in the Mail:

A devastating arson attack carried out on a church was committed by two schoolchildren aged just six and nine. 

Religious books, a valuable alter cloth, carpets and fittings were all destroyed in the blaze amounting to £10,000 worth of damage.

It is thought that four small fires were started as an act of vandalism and that the children didn't expect for the blaze to get out of hand.

Jun 21, 2012 , , , , ,

Not adding up: Criminal reconciliation in Chinese juvenile justice

from the article in Dui Hua's Human Rights Journal:

Recent amendments to China’s Criminal Procedure Law involve special procedures for handling cases involving juvenile defendants and resolving cases through criminal reconciliation. Although the law does not explicitly link the two, criminal reconciliation has been a key feature in the development of China’s juvenile justice system under the principle of “education first, punishment second.”

Dui Hua welcomes criminal reconciliation as a means to restorative justice and reduced juvenile incarceration, but research suggests that the relatively new measure is experiencing some growing pains in China. Jiang Jue (姜珏), a PhD candidate in the School of Law at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, has done extensive research on criminal reconciliation in China and has seen how the process works in many juvenile cases. Her research indicates that current implementation of criminal reconciliation falls short of juvenile justice principles by alienating youth and stifling attempts at education.

Jun 20, 2012 , , , , , ,

I want justice for conflict victims in Kenya

from the article by Tecla Namachnija in Eve Woman Magazine:

My experiences with people who had suffered as a result of conflict motivated me to go for the TJRC job. The conditions they faced were so harsh that I suffered secondary trauma at some point because I internalised the pain and suffering of the internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees I interacted with.

Having trained in restorative justice in the US and through my experience at the community level, I realised that the line between the victim and perpetrator is so blurred that only restorative justice could work.

Jun 15, 2012 , , , , ,

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