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Showing 4 posts filed under: Victim [–] published between Mar 01, 2011 and Mar 31, 2011 [Show all]

'Why I confronted the man who raped me’

from David Barrett's article in The Sunday Telegraph:

Dr Claire Chung, who has agreed to waive her anonymity in The Sunday Telegraph, was raped twice in the stinking stairwell of a multi-storey car park, and the crime caused her life to collapse “like a pack of cards”.

Dr Chung, a highly regarded GP with more than 20 years’ medical experience, lost her job, her marriage and her home after being raped by Stephen Allen Gale, who had been released from prison for another sexual offence just one day earlier.

But following the attack, which she described in chilling detail, Dr Chung negotiated with the authorities to allow a meeting with Gale in prison.

The meeting was organised as part of a “restorative justice” scheme, which brings criminals face to face with their victims.

Mar 30, 2011 , , , , , ,

Victims confront thief in jail

from the article in The Northern Echo:

The meeting was arranged by police as part of a restorative justice project and Mrs Turnbull, 57, of Deneside, had second thoughts about going along.

She said: “I had decided I was not going to go. I felt as if I could not face meeting him.

“It was only because the police turned up on my doorstep to pick me up that I went along because I did not want to waste their time.”

Mrs Turnbull spent 90 minutes with the offender in Durham Prison, where he is serving a five-year sentence.

Mar 28, 2011 , , , , , ,

Interview with Professor Nicola Lacey

from the interview by Kim Workman of Rethinking Crime and Punishment:

Professor Nicola Lacey is a Senior Research fellow and Professor of criminal theory at All Souls College, University of Oxford. She was in New Zealand recently to give the 2010 Shirley Smith Address on the subject of the Politics of Punishment. We took the opportunity to pick her brain.

....Rethinking: Someone said something to me the other day about how if we are going to put the requirements of victims in this process it should be their needs, rather than their wants.

NL: Exactly. You need to have the debate about which needs can legitimately be met by the criminal justice process.

Mar 08, 2011 , ,

Non-formal education in the Middle East: Giving adolescents a second chance

from Curt Rhodes' article on unicef.org:

In May 2005 violence exploded during a soccer game among students who had just enrolled in their town’s first NFE class. Angry over a lost goal, Humam kicked his younger teammate Ayman to the ground. This kind of violence early in the programme jeopardized the entire approach to alternative education. Ayman was a shy, defenseless boy. Other boys like him might feel threatened, and the safety of the learning environment might dissolve if violence went unchecked.

The teaching facilitators decided that the violent incident would best be resolved by the students themselves ruling on justice for the harmed and a penalty for the offender. They announced a trial – with students taking the roles of judge, jury, prosecution and defense – and explained the legal process to the two boys and the other students.

Mar 01, 2011 , , , ,

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