Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Navigation

Stories of Restorative Justice

Read stories and case studies about restorative processes.

'I slept through the night for the first time since she died': The mum who went to prison to meet man responsible for daughter's death
from the article by Cathy Owen in Wales Online: Kate Morgan had struggled to come to terms with the death of her 22-year-old daughter Lona Wyn Jones in a horrific car crash two years ago. The 45-year-old from Dolgellau desperately wanted to visit the driver, Ian Edwards, who was sentenced to three years and nine months in prison after pleading guilty to dangerous driving. She said she had questions that only he could answer....
Addressing the harm done in a crime
from the article by Bill Pesch in Guampdn-com: ...To this day, nearly 20 years later, recalling these events still makes my blood boil. I have no sense of finality or resolution. Most disturbing, I never learned why the kid chose me to vandalize and I've never received an apology. I feel like the system let me down. These emotions welled up again in me a few weeks ago when I was attending a class in restorative justice at the University of Guam. Dave Afaisen, a counselor at the Department of Youth Affairs, and his son, Sage, were guest speakers. They told us a story very similar to mine.
'Premier League villains' go straight after meeting victims
from the article by Mark Tallentire in The Northern Echo: Durham Police chief constable Mike Barton said between them David Clark and Shaun Morton committed about 500 crimes a year. But after taking part in a restorative justice scheme, both are now drink and drug free and volunteering with other addict criminals.
Restorative Justice Conference between R and Mr Q
from the case report by Mark Creitzman: It was at this point, that Mr Q mentioned that he felt that he would like to be able to forgive R by the end of the meeting and that he had a challenge for R to consider. Mr Q asked R if he was up to a challenge and he nodded ‘Yes’. Mr Q said that if R could prove that he wanted to change the path of his life and made progress in Cookham Wood, that on his exit from the YOI, Mr Q would mentor him and support him through his transition. Mr Q told us that his long-term plan could involve R and himself using the negativity of the offence and turning it in to a ‘power for good’ and delivering sessions to schools, YOIs, colleges or universities.
Restorative Justice Conference between R and Mr Q
Held at Cookham Wood YOI in Rochester on the 15th October 2014 at 11am. From the case report by Mark Creitzman.
How restorative justice is steering young offenders away from crime
from the article by Anna Bawden in The Guardian: In a small workshop on an industrial estate, Jordan Lee Caffyn is putting the finishing touches to a beautifully handcrafted wooden memory box. The box is the culmination of several days' graft that Caffyn, 18, is rightly proud of. But Caffyn is not a trainee joiner. He is at the workshop as part of Surrey's restorative justice scheme following his arrest for criminal damage. Rather than prosecute him, Caffyn was given the opportunity by a panel of police and youth support workers to make amends in the community.
Oklahoma teen acts to right his father's wrong
from the report by Steve Hartman on CBS News: Seventy-eight-year-old Tona Herndon of Bethany, Okla., was vulnerable in every way. Her husband of 60 years had died just two weeks earlier.... She was mugged as she visited her husband's grave. The mugger got away with her purse and $700, but not for long. Police caught him, and the news put his mug shot on TV.
Fatal crash lies lead to home detention
from the article by Anne Clarkson in The Press: Two men who lied to the police after an accident that killed a man were sentenced to home detention in the Christchurch District Court today. Feng Sun, 39, told the police he was the driver of a truck that crashed off the road in the Otira Gorge in April 2012, and Yu Ouyang, 52, who was a witness in a car following the truck, also said Sun was the driver.
Toronto ‘spiceman’ case sent to unique restorative justice program before sentencing
From the Torstar New Service article: Before Naveen Polapady is sentenced for assaulting and throwing spices at a man he says he believed was a thief, he and the man he injured will take the unusual step of talking it out — no lawyers present. Polapady’s case was referred to a “vibrant restorative justice mediation service” at the St. Stephen’s Community House in Kensington Market, Crown attorney John Flaherty told the court Monday morning. It may be a chance for Manuel Belo, who needed six stitches to the head and was covered in welts after the violent altercation three years ago outside Polapady’s restaurant, to get redress for the wrongs done to him, the court heard.
Coronation Street bosses slammed over "completely inaccurate" restorative justice storyline by police
from the article by Rob Leigh in Mirror: Coronation Street has been blasted by police over their restorative justice storyline. The ITV soap recently aired scenes where Gail McIntyre met with Michael Rodwell (played by Les Dennis) in jail after he burgled her house. However, the plot - which has been branded "overly dramatic" and "disgraceful" - put a real-life crime victim off meeting the person who stole her credit card because she was "too scared".
Boulder's new restorative justice partnership
from the article by Bill Ellis in the Daily Camera: Under House Bill 13-1254 the 20-year-old Longmont Community Justice Partnership (LCJP.org ), will be expanded to become the 20th Judicial District's pilot project in Boulder. Boulder will import successful innovation from Longmont. Below is a snapshot of what you can expect.
Video: Inside the Sycamore Tree Project
from Sycamore Voices: In June 2014, six crime survivors talked exclusively about their experiences inside the breakthrough restorative justice program called The Sycamore Tree Project. We share this short video in the hopes that other victims of crime can experience the real life breakthrough that the program offers.
I wanted revenge but found compassion
from the article on Sycamore Voices: When I first heard of restorative practice I thought it was a load of rubbish. I thought that all the offender had to do was say sorry and that was it. So how would you know if they were genuine or not? I have come to realise that it is way more than that. To take part in a restorative practice session takes strength and courage from both sides and is way more than a simple “I’m sorry.” It is restorative on both sides!
Alternative sentence praised
from the article on stuff.co.nz: The hardline Sensible Sentencing Trust has come out in support of a judge's decision not to jail a drink-driver who killed a New Plymouth woman. Hogan Bolton, 31, of New Plymouth, was sentenced on July 4 to nine months' home detention following the death of artist and mother Carmen Rogers after she was hit in Brougham St on May 6. His breath alcohol was 1297mcg. The legal level is 400mcg. As well as making a $50,000 emotional harm reparation to the family he has agreed to appear in an anti-drink driving documentary.
Families of slain Israeli and Palestinian teens turn to each other for comfort
from the article on the Jewish Daily Forward: The families of murdered Israeli teen Naftali Fraenkel and murdered Palestinian teen Mohammed Abu Khdeir are drawing comfort from an unexpected source: each other.
After assault, woman finds hope and career in restorative justice
from the article on NPR: Lorenn Walker works to help both victims and offenders after crimes are committed. She's a restorative lawyer from the North Shore of Oahu in Hawaii, where she focuses on violence prevention and works on reentry programs for prisoners. Her work in restorative justice began after a personal encounter with crime, when she was assaulted 38 years ago.
Offender: “Sycamore Tree is not just a course, but a life changer”
from the article by PF England and Wales: I completed this course some months ago, but I am still experiencing the benefits even today. I am a huge advocate of Sycamore Tree as it has opened my eyes to the impact of my crime on numerous people, especially those who I did not know about, those who were victims through the ripple effect.
How far would you go to stop another crime?
from the story on Sycamore Voices: It’s easy to feel helpless about the rate of crime in our society but a growing number of people are facing this fear and participating in the justice system to make it more effective for our communities. They have a holistic view of crime that looks at the total impact of harm – starting with the victim – and takes practical steps to deal with it.
Home raid victim meets her burglar
from the article in The Argus: A burglary victim has told how she met the man who broke into her family’s home. The homeowner met the jailed burglar through the Sussex Restorative Justice Partnership – a scheme where victims meet offenders to tell them how they feel.
Sycamore Tree Project® is ‘tougher on crime’
from the article by Melissa Hutton: With a lump in my throat coupled with a sense of nervousness, I entered the Correctional Centre with my fellow victims of crime and the facilitators of the Sycamore Tree Project. What transpired throughout the next 8 weeks was extraordinary.

Document Actions

Restorative Justice Online - Featured Video

A long-time repeat offender describes the impact of meeting with his victims.