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Provides a listing of articles on restorative justice developments in Austria. Articles appear in the order in which they were added to the site with the most recent appearing first.

Justice in Ferguson, Missouri: Can restorative justice apply here?
from Lisa Rea's blog entry at Restorative Justice International: I have worked in the area of civil rights in the past. I include my restorative justice work in the last 20 years as being part of that civil rights work. But in the 1980s I also served on a local civil rights coalition in the Sacramento area in California where our focus was to respond to acts of racial hatred in the region. This included acts of racial violence and intimidation by the Ku Klux Klan and the neo-nazi party.
What kind of prison might the inmates design?
from the article by Lee Romney in the LA Times: ....The 18 men who enrolled in the four-day workshop this summer were contemplating restorative justice through a novel lens: design. As consensus builds that traditional criminal justice models are failing to prevent recidivism, [Deanna] VanBuren and fellow instructor Barb Toews, an academic, have joined a small chorus of designers, researchers and even judges and wardens calling for new spaces to match the tenets of restorative justice. ...."What would a room look like," she then asked, "where you could face anything you've done and be accountable for it?"
Garden provides more than fresh food
from the article in the Daily Journal: More than a ton of fresh produce was harvested from the Restorative Justice Garden at the Farmington Correctional Center. The exact amount was 2,053 pounds of potatoes, tomatoes, cabbage, beans, okra, bell peppers, and zucchini. This huge pile of nutritious goodness was picked over the course of just three days. Shortly after being picked, the veggies were on the way to helping others.
Boulder's new restorative justice partnership
from the article by Bill Ellis in the Daily Camera: Under House Bill 13-1254 the 20-year-old Longmont Community Justice Partnership (LCJP.org ), will be expanded to become the 20th Judicial District's pilot project in Boulder. Boulder will import successful innovation from Longmont. Below is a snapshot of what you can expect.
Face to face with victims: Boulder County to expand restorative justice
from the article on Daily Camera Boulder County News: As a prosecutor, Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett is a big believer in the American court system. But even Garnett admits there are times when months of hearings and drawn-out jury trials aren't the answer — especially in the case of adolescents. "That may make sense for a murder case, but it doesn't make sense for a kid knocking a mailbox off its post," Garnett said. His office will be one of four in Colorado participating in a state pilot program to help youths stay out of the court system — even the juvenile court system — and resolve their cases through restorative justice. Over the next few months, Garnett and his staff will be working on opening the 20th Judicial District Attorney's Center of Prevention and Restorative Justice.
Another road to justice
from the article in Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: The group of men listens, mesmerized, as Lynn BeBeau talks about the last time she saw her husband alive. "I told him the same thing I always did: `I love you. Be careful.' " Her husband grinned back. "Honey, don't worry about me. Me and God are like this." He held up two crossed fingers and smiled. Hours later, the Eau Claire police officer was shot to death in the line of duty. The hulking men in prison greens sit perfectly still as BeBeau fights back tears. They are murderers, armed robbers, drug dealers, child molesters.
Breaking a vicious cycle [Editorial]
from the article in the Baltimore Sun: For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.
For New Orleans, restorative justice means reconciliation
from the article in the Ionia Sentinel Standard: When Chris Gunther, New Orleans, La.'s coordinator for the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention and a Health Department lead, reached out to stakeholders throughout New Orleans, a student advocacy group called Rethinkers made clear to him and his Forum team the need to expand restorative approaches to conflict in schools.
As city prepares to rethink school discipline, a look at restorative justice programs in action
from the article in Chalk Beat: It’s a clear morning in mid-June, and Validus Preparatory Academy in the Bronx has that end-of-the-school-year feel. Students bid farewell to teachers, seniors tote freshly printed yearbooks, and most noticeably, students are allowed to disregard the school uniform without a call home or a trip to the principal’s office. Yet even on a regular day, breaking the dress code would not lead to these consequences. In Validus terms, offenders would be “brought to Fairness” instead.
Restorative Justice Project receives $60,000 grant from Lerner Foundation
from the article from the Penobscot Bay Pilot: The Restorative Justice Project of the Midcoast, a program promoting fundamental change in the justice system and schools, has received a $60,000 grant from the Emanuel and Pauline A. Lerner Foundation. The grant will enable comprehensive outreach to the community to promote understanding of restorative justice. Key components of this outreach effort are to involve more community members as facilitators of restorative conferences and as mentors of juvenile and adult offenders, to equip them to bring restorative practices into many aspects of their lives, and to build public understanding of restorative justice.
Close to Home: Success of restorative program shows in numbers
from the article in the Press Democrat: Last October, after the Santa Rosa City Council approved funding to introduce restorative practices in schools, The Press Democrat ran an editorial that stated, “Spending $125,000 on a one-year pilot program is a lot to ask — especially for the Santa Rosa City Schools District. But in this case, it's money well spent.”
Practicing restorative justice at Oakland's Skyline High
from the article by Sarah O'Neal: Sonia Black is walking through the halls of Skyline High School, trying to get the last few kids to class. Black is in charge of discipline and attendance for ninth and twelfth graders at Skyline. She’s been at the school for two years and this year, they’re trying something new: restorative justice. “The whole idea of restorative justice is, how can we make this situation right so you don’t have to come up and see me anymore?” says Black. “We want to have a conversation about what’s going on and what we can do to resolve this so that the student is in the classroom learning and the teacher is able to teach.”
'US Should significantly reduce rate of incarceration,' says new report
from the article on Phys.org: Given the minimal impact of long prison sentences on crime prevention and the negative social consequences and burdensome financial costs of U.S. incarceration rates, which have more than quadrupled in the last four decades, the nation should revise current criminal justice policies to significantly reduce imprisonment rates, says a new report from the National Research Council.
Restorative justice for everyone: An innovative program and case study from Turners Falls High School in Massachusetts
from the article by David Bulley and Thomas Osborn: Restorative Justice generally exists as an alternative to traditional discipline. In most schools a student who acts out will be referred to the assistant principal or to the dean of students who then makes a determination: Is the student a candidate for restorative justice or should they be disciplined the traditional way of detentions or suspensions? Often this includes a choice by the student. In fact, as part of most restorative conferences, the perpetrator is informed that participation is voluntary and that at any time they can opt out and subject themselves to traditional justice. One problem with this system is that too many students welcome an out of school suspension.
St. Louis program helps police and public smooth over minor conflicts
from the article in the St. Louis Post -Dispatch: If you think a city cop was rude, cursed at you or treated you unfairly, you might have a chance to hammer out your differences in a face-to-face chat. St. Louis police are running a pilot program aimed at resolving bitter but relatively minor conflicts between citizens and officers. So far, the department has resolved 15 complaints through mediation since the program started in October 2011, said Lt. Scott Gardner, an internal affairs commander.
‘What We All Want is Respect’
from the article by Candace McCoy: What’s next for police-neighborhood relationships in New York City? All parties know that aggressive stop-and-frisk practices must change. A federal judge said so.
Restorative group conferencing and sexting: Repairing harm in Wright County
from the article by Nancy Riestenberg: Three years ago, in a middle school in Wright County, Minnesota, students discovered sexually explicit pictures of a student on the cell phone of her boyfriend. The students ran to the bathroom with the cell phone and sent the pictures on to eight other students. By the time the adults in the school discovered them, many student cell phones had received the pictures. The administration asked the school resource officer from the Sheriff’s Office to investigate. Potentially many students could be charged with sending or receiving sexually explicit pictures of a minor, a felony offense. What was the County Attorney going to do?
W Bridges on Discipline with dignity: Oakland classrooms try healing instead of punishment
Happy endings are good. Admittedly the results of this RJ intervention were probably more the exception than the rule, but it is a good example [...]
Jain on Discipline with dignity: Oakland classrooms try healing instead of punishment
Yes,the boy should have been made to realise the mistake,asked to suggest his own punishment and assurance of corrective behaviour.How so ever the stress he [...]
D. Thomas on Discipline with dignity: Oakland classrooms try healing instead of punishment
Good story, but it seems too "happy ending". After more of than 20 years of experience, I hope that this RJ can improve the current [...]

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