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Provides a listing of articles on restorative justice developments in Austria. Articles appear in the order in which they were added to the site with the most recent appearing first.

Philly to host first-ever ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ youth hackathon next week
from the article by Juliana Reyes in Technical.ly Philly: Minority youth will become civic hackers at the first “My Brother’s Keeper” hackathon next week. It’s a response to President Obama’s call to action for organizations to help black boys succeed. Though the hackathon is geared toward boys, girls are also welcome. Participants will build apps around “education, wellness, restorative justice, food, sustainability and masculinity,” according to a release.
Peace room trumps suspensions at Lincoln Park High School
from the article by Paul Biasco on DNAinfo Chicago: During his seven years as assistant principal at Kenwood Academy, Michael Boraz learned to believe that punitive justice was the way to a disciplined and well-oiled school. The idea of a "peace circle" to handle problems rather than a five-day suspension or even a transfer was almost laughable to him.
Merced County high schools see the benefits of restorative justice discipline model
from the article by Ana B. Ibarra in the Merced Sun Star: High school officials in Merced County are taking a new approach at improving discipline policies on campuses, and that approach is showing a significant improvement in student participation and wellness, according to a new report. Restorative justice policies, which focus on non-adversarial and dialogue-based decisionmaking, are proving to be more effective than zero-tolerance practices, school officials said during a presentation last week.
Two youth facilities raise funds for remembrance of murder victims
from the article by Joe Orlando in Inside CDCR News: Sept. 25 was a national day of remembrance of murder victims. At the State Capitol, youth from the N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility (NACYCF) and the O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility (OHCYCF) donated their time and money to put on the event. The two youth correctional facilities raised more than $1,000. Misty Foster, President of the Sacramento Chapter of Parents of Murdered Children, said the donated funds made the event possible.
Restoring justice: Sonoma County and beyond
from the article by John Beck in Sonomoa County Gazette: Last summer, when the Santa Rosa City Schools District was looking for a way to curb the fourth highest rate of suspensions in the state, it turned to restorative justice as the solution. “We were almost an outlier,” said Jen Klose, Santa City Schools board member. “We had truly become zero tolerance.” Searching for a new paradigm for discipline, Santa Rosa City Schools board president Bill Carle said, “We started focusing on how do we do this in a different way, and that’s when we found restorative justice.”
Editor’s comment: Restorative justice
from the opinion piece by David Shrimpton in Talking Retail: The hub for grocery retail: The issue of ‘restorative justice’ debated at this month’s ACS Crime Seminar was an extremely interesting one. On the one hand, experts were extolling the benefits of the approach, claiming it can reduce reoffending rates by more than 25%. On the other, retailers were sceptical – as their experience of restorative justice seems to have been of police officers issuing summary remedies in an effort to wrap up the case as quickly as possible.
Restorative Justice offers an alternative to traditional criminal process
from the article by Danny Bishop on Collegian Central: Everyone makes mistakes, and the City of Fort Collins and Colorado State University have Restorative Justice programs which allow legal mistakes to be handled through conferencing instead of through the courts. Perrie McMillin, program coordinator for Restorative Justice in Fort Collins, said the program allows individuals to take part in a mediated conversation between the person who caused the harm and those who were affected. The conversation addresses the harm that was caused and how to remedy it.
Justice takes to the streets of LA
from the article by Mike Feuer in Los Angeles Times: Since charter reform paved the way for neighborhood councils, Los Angeles has made steady progress toward a more neighborhood-centered government. But up to now, that hasn't included neighborhood-centered justice.
Restorative justice is a win-win
from the article by John D. Due Jr. for CNN.com: ....The larger question this case raises is the role of the police force in a community. Is it to be at war with the community on a militarized basis to destroy the enemy in a zero-sum game of winners and losers? Does this mean we need to train our police in anti-terrorism and war games with a military orientation of being a winner against a loser?....
Oklahoma teen acts to right his father's wrong
from the report by Steve Hartman on CBS News: Seventy-eight-year-old Tona Herndon of Bethany, Okla., was vulnerable in every way. Her husband of 60 years had died just two weeks earlier.... She was mugged as she visited her husband's grave. The mugger got away with her purse and $700, but not for long. Police caught him, and the news put his mug shot on TV.
Restorative discipline should be common practice to lower the dropout rate for both students and teachers
from the blog entry by Marilyn Armour in Know: ....Lacking specific training and skills in managing behavior issues, many teachers believe that youths, like themselves, should have the innate skills to manage their own conduct. Unfortunately, frequently used punitive measures send students spiraling toward suspensions, involvement in the juvenile justice system, and diminished motivation to engage in or finish school. Not surprising, student discipline correlates with dropout rates, and that’s particularly troubling in Texas where 25 percent of students fail to graduate.
Justice in Ferguson, Missouri: Can restorative justice apply here?
from Lisa Rea's blog entry at Restorative Justice International: I have worked in the area of civil rights in the past. I include my restorative justice work in the last 20 years as being part of that civil rights work. But in the 1980s I also served on a local civil rights coalition in the Sacramento area in California where our focus was to respond to acts of racial hatred in the region. This included acts of racial violence and intimidation by the Ku Klux Klan and the neo-nazi party.
What kind of prison might the inmates design?
from the article by Lee Romney in the LA Times: ....The 18 men who enrolled in the four-day workshop this summer were contemplating restorative justice through a novel lens: design. As consensus builds that traditional criminal justice models are failing to prevent recidivism, [Deanna] VanBuren and fellow instructor Barb Toews, an academic, have joined a small chorus of designers, researchers and even judges and wardens calling for new spaces to match the tenets of restorative justice. ...."What would a room look like," she then asked, "where you could face anything you've done and be accountable for it?"
Garden provides more than fresh food
from the article in the Daily Journal: More than a ton of fresh produce was harvested from the Restorative Justice Garden at the Farmington Correctional Center. The exact amount was 2,053 pounds of potatoes, tomatoes, cabbage, beans, okra, bell peppers, and zucchini. This huge pile of nutritious goodness was picked over the course of just three days. Shortly after being picked, the veggies were on the way to helping others.
Boulder's new restorative justice partnership
from the article by Bill Ellis in the Daily Camera: Under House Bill 13-1254 the 20-year-old Longmont Community Justice Partnership (LCJP.org ), will be expanded to become the 20th Judicial District's pilot project in Boulder. Boulder will import successful innovation from Longmont. Below is a snapshot of what you can expect.
Face to face with victims: Boulder County to expand restorative justice
from the article on Daily Camera Boulder County News: As a prosecutor, Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett is a big believer in the American court system. But even Garnett admits there are times when months of hearings and drawn-out jury trials aren't the answer — especially in the case of adolescents. "That may make sense for a murder case, but it doesn't make sense for a kid knocking a mailbox off its post," Garnett said. His office will be one of four in Colorado participating in a state pilot program to help youths stay out of the court system — even the juvenile court system — and resolve their cases through restorative justice. Over the next few months, Garnett and his staff will be working on opening the 20th Judicial District Attorney's Center of Prevention and Restorative Justice.
Another road to justice
from the article in Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: The group of men listens, mesmerized, as Lynn BeBeau talks about the last time she saw her husband alive. "I told him the same thing I always did: `I love you. Be careful.' " Her husband grinned back. "Honey, don't worry about me. Me and God are like this." He held up two crossed fingers and smiled. Hours later, the Eau Claire police officer was shot to death in the line of duty. The hulking men in prison greens sit perfectly still as BeBeau fights back tears. They are murderers, armed robbers, drug dealers, child molesters.
Breaking a vicious cycle [Editorial]
from the article in the Baltimore Sun: For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.
For New Orleans, restorative justice means reconciliation
from the article in the Ionia Sentinel Standard: When Chris Gunther, New Orleans, La.'s coordinator for the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention and a Health Department lead, reached out to stakeholders throughout New Orleans, a student advocacy group called Rethinkers made clear to him and his Forum team the need to expand restorative approaches to conflict in schools.
As city prepares to rethink school discipline, a look at restorative justice programs in action
from the article in Chalk Beat: It’s a clear morning in mid-June, and Validus Preparatory Academy in the Bronx has that end-of-the-school-year feel. Students bid farewell to teachers, seniors tote freshly printed yearbooks, and most noticeably, students are allowed to disregard the school uniform without a call home or a trip to the principal’s office. Yet even on a regular day, breaking the dress code would not lead to these consequences. In Validus terms, offenders would be “brought to Fairness” instead.

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