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Provides a listing of articles on restorative justice developments in Austria. Articles appear in the order in which they were added to the site with the most recent appearing first.

O'Brien, Sandra. National survey looks at states’ development and implementation of restorative justice policy--Part 3
According to Sandra O’Brien, several years after restorative justice first appeared in the United States, the staff at the Balanced and Restorative Justice Project (Florida Atlantic University) embarked on a study to assess if and how restorative justice principles are being developed and implemented in all fifty states. Conducted through interviews with an appropriate person in each state between January and March 1999, the BARJ staff surveyed five key questions or areas. Hence, the results of the study are organized into five sections. Here O’Brien summarizes the findings and analysis for Sections 4 and 5. Section 4 covers the question as to how restorative justice is put into operation in each state. Section 5 deals with the question of levels of funding and resources appropriated for restorative justice programs and practices.
Editor. Interchange: Ellen Halbert helps the Austin, TX D.A.’s office reach out to victims of crime
Too often the criminal justice system leaves the victim largely out of the criminal justice process. In contrast, restorative justice seeks to place the victim and the harm suffered at the center of the justice process. Ellen Halbert knows this all too well from personal experience. A victim of an extremely violent assault, she is intimately acquainted with what it means to be a victim of crime – to endure both the crime and the criminal justice system. She also knows all this from professional experience for, out of her experience, she became director of the Victim/Witness Division in the Travis County, Texas, district attorney’s office. In this personal and professional context, Halbert is convinced, as she explains in this article, that restorative justice is the right and best approach to dealing with offenders and victims.
Editor. Spotlight on Illinois counties move toward restorative justice
In the previous issue we looked at Illinois’ new Juvenile Justice Reform Provisions of 1998 and how this changed the juvenile code by including balanced and restorative justice. This article looks at some of the changes being made around the state that are restorative in nature. Author's abstract.
Hamilton, Robin. Project CRAFT: A National Model for Training Juvenile Offenders
Here Robin Hamilton writes about the Home Builders Institute’s Project CRAFT. The acronym “CRAFTâ€? stands for Community, Restitution, and Apprenticeship-Focused Training. Project CRAFT is a several month-long comprehensive, hands-on training program designed to give young people skills in the construction trades. It is recognized as a national model in training and placing high-risk youth in the building trades. Hamilton summarizes the history of the project, its key elements, and some of its successes.
Editor. Balanced and Restorative Justice Project Update: Balanced and Restorative Justice Project to Launch “Special Emphasis States Initiativeâ€?
This article consists of an announcement by the Balanced and Restorative Justice Project (BARJ) of a particular initiative to begin in 2000. As indicated at the outset, through a national study on restorative justice policy development and implementation, the BARJ Project gather a significant amount of information about states that have formally adopted BARJ language into their mission and policies with respect to state juvenile codes. In response the BARJ Project plans to launch a Special Emphasis States Initiative. The aim is to work with leaders in target states (identified in the article) to foster and strengthen restorative juvenile justice efforts in those states.
O'Brien, Sandra. National survey looks at states’ development and implementation of restorative justice policy--Part 2
According to Sandra O’Brien, several years after restorative justice first appeared in the United States, the staff at the Balanced and Restorative Justice Project (Florida Atlantic University) embarked on a study to assess if and how restorative justice principles are being developed and implemented in all fifty states. Conducted through interviews with an appropriate person in each state between January and March 1999, the BARJ staff surveyed five key questions or areas. Hence, the results of the study are organized into five sections. Here O’Brien summarizes the findings and analysis for one question in Section 2 and for all of Section 3. Section 2 covers how restorative justice was promoted or initiated in each state. The particular question highlighted in this part of Section 2 looks at what environmental conditions influenced the policy or organizational changes. Section 3 identifies who is responsible for implementing restorative justice policy in each state and to whom restorative justice applies.
Editor. Interchange: A California judge promotes restorative justice
A judge "falls in love" with restorative justice and victims, youthful offenders and communities in Santa Clara County, California benefit from the results. Author's abstract.
Editor. Spotlight on Illinois revises delinquency statute
Illinois’ State Legislature enacted the Juvenile Justice Reform Provisions of 1998 to replace Article V of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987. The legislation, which went into effect on January 1, 1999, bases much of its contents on the balanced and restorative justice model. This article looks at the legislation and the changes it instituted. In the next issue, we will explore how these changes are being implemented around the state. Author's abstract.
Editor. Balanced and Restorative Justice Project Update: Focus on 1999-2000
As indicated in the title, this article consists of an update by the Balanced and Restorative Justice Project (BARJ) staff on the project’s progress in fulfilling its goals, with a focus on the 1999-2000 period. The primary target audience of the BARJ Project is the juvenile justice system. At the same time, the strategic aim is support of efforts to transform the role of victims, offenders, communities, and governments in the justice process and in meeting the needs of all four stakeholders. For 1999 to 2000, this article then surveys the project’s efforts in providing assessment, evaluation, and monitoring; education awareness and information sharing; training and workshops; implementation tool guides and policy publications; and strategic technical assistance.
O'Brien, Sandra. National survey looks at states’ development and implementation of restorative justice policy
Several years after restorative justice first appeared in the United States, the staff at the BARJ Project decided it was time to assess if and how restorative justice principles are being used in all fifty states. Conducted from January through March 1999, the National Restorative Juvenile Justice Policy Development and Implementation Assessment (forthcoming) inquired about the development and implementation of restorative justice policies and practices in the juvenile justice system. Previous less formal surveys indicated that approximately twenty-six states have implemented restorative justice at either the program, institutional, system, and/or state level (Freivalds, 1995; Klein, 1996). This survey represents the first national survey undertaken in the field of restorative justice relating to organizational reform and policy implementation at the state level. The following is a brief summary of the methodology and findings of the assessment. (extract)
Editor. Spotlight on Dakota County, Minnesota
Dakota County, Minnesota, is located south of Minneapolis. In 1989 Minnesota passed a Community Corrections Act whereby counties are responsible for juvenile institutions, adult alternatives to jail, and probation and parole for both juveniles and adults. The Dakota County Community Corrections Department (CCD) was selected as one of the three pilot test sites for the Balanced and Restorative Justice (BARJ) project in 1992. This article describes the CCD’s testing of BARJ, with technical assistance from the Balanced and Restorative Justice Project operated out of Florida Atlantic University. Dakota County sought to apply restorative justice as a new framework for understanding and responding to crime. This vision required a new mission for CCD. The process for developing this new mission and its implications for staff and programs is explored in the article.
Bureau of Justice Assistance. Summary of Workshops: The 1999 Bureau of Justice Assistance National Partnership Meeting
In 1999 the Bureau of Justice Assistance (U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs) sponsored a significant conference or National Partnership Meeting entitled “Working Together for Peace and Justice in the 21st Century.â€? Held April 6 to 8 in Washington, D.C., the conference featured 200 speakers, 56 workshops and plenary sessions, and more than 1,100 participants from the United States, U.S. Territories, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Canada, and Australia. Participants celebrated accomplishments in crime control and crime prevention; and they shared information on a variety of criminal justice programs, innovations, issues, and trends. This document provides a summary of workshops from the conference, transcripts of keynote speakers, and contact information for conference presenters. The major topics under which workshops were organized are these: community partnerships for justice; creating system balance; and building a comprehensive justice system. Of particular note for those interested in restorative justice are many of the workshops under the topic of community partnerships for justice. The subjects of these workshops include, but are not limited to, the following: the nature of community justice; community ownership of crime problems and solutions; the role of youth in community justice; community policing; children of incarcerated parents; restorative justice from the victim’s perspective; strengthening and sustaining community partnerships; best practices in crime prevention; and tribal and non-tribal issues in law enforcement.
Monahan, Lynn Hunt and Niesyn, Patricia A and Gaboury, Mario T and Monahan, James J. Victims' Voices in the Correctional Setting: Cognitive Gains in an Offender Education Program
Restorative justice asserts that the offender has a responsibility to repair the harm done, to be accountable rather that just do time. The restorative justice philosophy can be found in a variety of settings, with one of the most recent settings incorporated into a range of sentencing and offender treatment approaches. A promising approach is the victim-awareness education program which allows inmates an opportunity to know about the scope of victimization, as well as develop insight into its aftereffects in the life of the victim. In 1997, the Connecticut Department of Correction initiated a 40-hour victim-awareness education program, VOICES, and classes began in 1998. This study analyzed data from the fall 1998 to December 2001 to assess the effectiveness of the program. A 50-item questionnaire was developed and administered to participants in the VOICES program before beginning the program and after its completion. The intent was to measure knowledge of and sensitivity of the impact of crime on victims. The results of the study provided significant support to the hypothesis that the VOICES program would produce increases in specific aspects of offender knowledge of and sensitivity to crime victims. Those offenders exposed to the program had a significant increase in knowledge of the facts of victimization and increased knowledge of victim rights. They were also more sensitive to the plight of victims. Abstract courtesy of National Criminal Justice Reference Service, www.ncjrs.org.
Furness, Amanda. Turning Toward Compassion: Restorative Justice works to develop youths' conscience
It isn't enough just to boss them around. Parents, teachers and court authorities have found this statement to be true in their dealings with many of today's youth - often losing their children to the system after forced discipline fails to work. A method recently introduced in New Orleans called the "restorative justice" movement is hoping to revolutionize the relationships between youth and their communities by exhibiting the most basic human emotion. Love. (extract)
Planning Committee for the Balanced and Restorative Justice Conference. Directory of Michigan Programs Incorporating Restorative Justice Principles
The Directory of Michigan Programs Incorporating Restorative Justice Principles is an initial attempt to catalogue Michigan juvenile programs that utilize one or more restorative justice principles. Restorative justice programs promote maximum participation of the victim, juvenile offender, and community in juvenile justice proceedings. Balanced attention is given to offender accountability, offender competency development, and community protection. The programs described in this directory utilize one or more of these principles: the programs are not based entirely on restorative justice principles. (excerpt)
Enns, Elaine. California Victim Offender Program Directory
A list of victim offender programs in California, with contact information and other identifying information such as: type of agency, types of referrals, referral point in the juvenile justice system, number of cases received/mediated in 2003, and other programs offered.
Schellenberg, Jill S. Public Opinion on Implementing Restorative Justice Principles in Fresno, California
The research in this project indicates where the public stands on how to meet the goals of a fair and just criminal justice system. People of different ethnic groups, ages, gender, and personal experience with crime in Fresno, California were polled to see how they felt about alternatives to the criminal justice system. Polling Hispanics and African-Americans was especially important because these groups are more often victims of crime than other ethnic groups in Fresno. The research showed that, when given the choice, people favored restorative methods of dealing with crime, rather than retributive methods. (excerpt)
Deschutes County Board of Supervisors. Community Justice Resolution: Resolution No. 96-122 (Deschutes County, Oregon)
Resolution of the Deschutes County Board of Commissioners adopting community justice as "the central mission and purpose of the county's community corrections efforts."
Deschutes County Juvenile Community Justice. Deschutes County Juvenile Community Justice Report: A Report Card to Our Stakeholders; 2002 Family Survey Results
This 2001 annual report card from Deschutes county, Oregon provides a brief overview of programmes and outcomes.
Deschutes County Juvenile Community Justice. 2003 Deschutes County Juvenile Community Justice Report Card
We are pleased to present this 2003 Juvenile Community Justice Report Card to our stakeholders, and hope that it leads to a better understanding of the issues facing the youth and families of our community. This publication is our third year of reporting to the community on a set of performance measures designed to inform citizens about our ability to restore justice for victims, build safer communities and hold youth accountable. (excerpt)

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